Biographies of Women's Suffrage – M

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Victoria May McAlmon (1879-1969) [Madison, Lake County] organized a suffrage symposium in Madison in March 1910 to support the ballot campaign that year [Madison Daily Leader (SD), March 8, 1910, March 30, 1910; Page 4, Bulletin – votes for women, c1910, RA08440, Pyle Papers, USD]. McAlmon was born in Ontario and came to South Dakota with her family; her father, Rev. John A. McAlmon, was a Presbyterian minister. She graduated from the State Normal School in Madison in 1901 and worked there as an Instructor of Expression in 1907-1910 [Madison Daily Leader (SD), June 21, 1899, May 16, 1901; The Anemone, State Normal School (Dakota State University), 1910]. In 1905-1907, she worked as a teacher in Minneapolis and returned there after graduating with a Ph. B. from the University of Chicago in 1912. She did graduate work at the University of Minnesota as well. In Minneapolis, she became a prominent educator and leader in the labor movement. One report said her interest in the labor movement was influenced as a student in Chicago by Prof. Sophonisba Breckenridge [Life and Labor: A Monthly Magazine 11(6) (June 1921), 184]. She was a charter member of the Minneapolis Teachers’ Federation (their union), held vice-president positions in multiple state labor organizations, and ran for Congress for the Farmer-Labor Party in 1924 [Minneapolis Journal (MN), November 5, 1905; Irish Standard (Minneapolis MN), February 15, 1913; University of Chicago, Alumni Directory (University of Chicago Press, 1913), 222; University of Chicago Magazine 11 (1918), 25; The Labor World (Duluth MN), July 24, 1920, February 4, 1922, July 22, 1922; National Leader (Minneapolis MN), April 17, 1922; Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, SD), April 15, 1924]. She also continued to support suffrage as a leader of the local Alice Paul Branch and Minnesota’s Business Women’s Branch of the National Women’s Party [The Suffragist 6(34) (September 14, 1918), 10 — 7(36) (September 6, 1919), 3].

In 1930, she was fired by the Minneapolis school board for her political activities. Her name was on a 1920 list of contributors or subscribers to the ACLU’s pamphlet service that had been quoted in an 1930 Investigation of Communist Propaganda in the U.S. House (I don’t know if that contributed or not…) [U.S. Congress, House Special Committee on Communist Activities in the United States, Investigation of Communist Propaganda (1930), 312; quoting “’The Fight for Free Speech’, NYC (September 1921)”]. She moved to Los Angeles, where her mother and sister were living, and did graduate work at the University of Southern California [Los Angeles Times (CA), June 7, 1931]. She continued labor organizing, working for the California State Federation of Teachers [California State Federation of Labor newsletter (January 12, 1949), 3, University of California, Berkeley, link to pdf]. In 2012, the house on Waverly drive that she had had designed by Modernist architect Rudolph Schindler, built in 1936, was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument [“McAlmon House,” Los Angeles Historic Resource Inventory, supporting documentation for the landmarking]. Also: “Victoria May McAlmon,” Findagrave.com.

More biographical details about McAlmon:

“Victoria McAlmon,” Who’s who Among Minnesota Women: A History of Woman’s Work in Minnesota… (Mary Dillon Foster, 1924), 187 (includes photo).

“Victoria McAlmon,” in Elaine Showalter, ed., These Modern Women: Autobiographical Essays from the Twenties (New York NY: Feminist Press, City University of New York, 1989), 109-110.

The Anemone, State Normal School (Dakota State University), 1910.

“Major” James K.P. McCallum (c.1844-post-1930) [Huron, Beadle County] and his wife Sarah signed the call for the first state suffrage convention in October 1889 [“Page 06 : The Convention Called,” DeVoe Collection, WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10; The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), October 10, 1889]. In February 1890, the McCallums spoke at the celebration held in Huron by local suffragists to mark Susan B. Anthony’s 70th birthday. J.K.P. told the history of Anthony’s first attempt to vote in Rochester NY in 1872 and her subsequent trial [Huron Daily Times (SD), February 17, 1890, “Page 26 : Susan B. Anthony Honored,” “Page 26 : In Honor of Miss Anthony,” Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10]. McCallum spoke at suffrage organizing meetings in Cavour, Onida, and Lebanon, the latter with Emma Smith DeVoe [The Woman’s Tribune (Boston), March 15, 1890 in “Page 27 : Beadle County Convention,” and Lebanon Observer, “Page 30 : Equal Suffrage,” Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10; Sully County Watchman (Onida SD), August 16, 1890]. He participated in the July state convention in Huron (in the midst of a leadership crisis), making the early motion that the attendees of the convention were “the authorized and legally constituted equal suffrage association of South Dakota” [The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), July 10, 1890; The Dakota Ruralist, July 19, 1890, “Page 44 : Entire Page,” Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10].

A comment on his Onida speech:
“His effort was a fairly good one and elicited considerable applause at different times.  The major is something of a speaker but did not show himself to have made a very deep study of the question but he has the quality of being in earnest at any rate.”
Sully County Watchman (Onida SD), August 16, 1890.

McCallum was born in Iowa, served the 3rd Iowa Cavalry (with John A. Pickler) in the Civil War, married Sarah Elizabeth Boon in 1867, graduated from the State University at Iowa City with a law degree in 1874, and became an attorney in Nebraska. They came to Dakota Territory in 1883. In Huron, McCallum practiced as an attorney, headed the local Kilpatrick post of the G.A.R., and served as a county delegate to the statehood constitutional convention in 1885. In 1888, he opened a dentistry office. In 1890, he participated in the county Independent party convention. In about 1895, the McCallums moved to Colorado, living in Fort Morgan, North Park, Fort Collins, and Denver. He continued to work as an attorney, perhaps also a dentist, was editor/publisher of the North Park Union newspaper for a couple years, and invested in copper and coal mining (one son was a mining engineer). In 1930, Sarah had passed away and James lived with his sister in San Diego CA [Nebraska Herald (Plattsmouth NE), July 16, 1874; Guy A. Brown, Reports of Cases in the Supreme Court of Nebraska 14 (Lincoln NE: State Journal Co., 1883), vi; Columbus Journal (NE), May 16, 1883; The Dakota Huronite (Huron, SD), July 9, 1885; Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), September 24, 1885; Press and Daily Dakotaian (Yankton SD), September 12, 1885; The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), March 23, 1886, August 10, 1888; July 7, 1890; Catalogue of Officers and Alumni of the State University of Iowa (1892), 40; Fort Morgan Times (CO) October 11, 1895; Weekly Courier (Fort Collins CO), September 21, 1899, January 18, 1900, March 16, 1904, August 23, 1905, March 21, 1906, October 14, 1908, January 24, 1913; North Park Union (Walden CO), August 10, 1900, February 7, 1902, May 2, 1902; The Daily Gate City and Constitution-Democrat (Keokuk IA), October 4, 1920; “James K.P. McCallum,” in Wilbur Fisk Stone, ed., History of Colorado, vol. 2 (Chicago: S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1918), 335-336; 1850-1930 census, via Ancestry.com].

Sarah E. McCallum (c.1845 – pre-1930) [Huron, Beadle County] and her husband James signed the call for the first state suffrage convention in October 1889 [“Page 06 : The Convention Called,” DeVoe Collection, WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10; The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), October 10, 1889]. In February 1890, the McCallums spoke at the celebration held in Huron by local suffragists to mark Susan B. Anthony’s 70th birthday [Huron Daily Times (SD), February 17, 1890, “Page 26 : Susan B. Anthony Honored,” “Page 26 : In Honor of Miss Anthony,” Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10]. I didn’t find much more on Sarah during their time in Huron, except a mention of her speaking at a picnic event with Sophia Harden in July 1890 [The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), July 5, 1890]. Sarah Elizabeth Boon was born in Ohio, and married James K.P. McCallum in 1867. They came to Dakota Territory in 1883. In about 1895, the McCallums moved to Colorado, living in Fort Morgan, North Park, Fort Collins, and Denver [Nebraska Herald (Plattsmouth NE), July 16, 1874; Columbus Journal (NE), May 16, 1883; Fort Morgan Times (CO) October 11, 1895; Weekly Courier (Fort Collins CO), August 23, 1905; “James K.P. McCallum,” in Wilbur Fisk Stone, ed., History of Colorado, vol. 2 (Chicago: S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1918), 335-336; 1880-1920 census, via Ancestry.com].

Prof. R.B. McClenon (1852-1920) [Madison, Lake County] was elected vice-president of the political equality club formed in Madison in May 1897 to work on the 1898 suffrage amendment campaign [Madison Daily Leader (SD), May 8, 1897]. McClenon participated in a speaker round table on suffrage at the July 1897 chautauqua at Lake Madison. He spoke on suffrage, taxation, and property ownership [Madison Daily Leader (SD), June 30, 1897, July 1, 1897]. In late October, the club had a convention at which McClenon spoke and was made an auditor for the club [Madison Daily Leader (SD), October 28, 1897, October 30, 1897, November 12, 1897]. at a Political Equality program at the Methodist church in November 1897, he spoke on “Are women hurting the chances of men in business” [Madison Daily Leader (SD), November 26, 1897]. Apparently, the club languished over the winter/spring of 1898, and a meeting was held at the McClenon house “for the purpose of reviving the work of the club” [Madison Daily Leader (SD), August 24, 1898].

Rufus Buel McClenon was born in New York, became a teacher, married Adeline White in 1882, and worked in New York and Wisconsin before coming to Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory in 1889 where he worked as high school principal. An active prohibitionist, he was reportedly fired in 1893 by “friends of the saloon who were members of the school board” and offered the position of superintendent of schools in Madison. From 1891 to 1904, McClenon frequently ran teacher institutes. He continued to be active in temperance/prohibition, was a leader in the International Good Templars, and was on the Prohibition party tickets in 1894 and 1902 for state superintendent of public instruction. He also supported the Chautauqua association (speaking multiple years for their WCTU days), Sunday schools and the Presbyterian church, and the South Dakota Educators’ Association. In 1902, he experienced conflict with the Madison school board and resigned, taking a position as principal of the normal department at Huron College. In 1904, he took a position teaching Latin and pedagogy at South Dakota Agricultural College in Brookings. In 1908, the McClenons moved to California for R.B.’s health [For instance: Madison Daily Leader (SD), September 7, 1893, December 29, 1893, July 16, 1894, November 14, 1894, December 31, 1894, July 22, 1895, November 23, 1895, May 2, 1896, June 1, 1896, July 8, 1897, May 10, 1902, June 24, 1902, June 26, 1902, February 17, 1904, September 2, 1904, April 20, 1908; Hot Springs Star (SD), July 17, 1891; Union County Courier (Elk Point SD), April 11, 1895; Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), July 7, 1898, August 14, 1902; Dakota Farmers’ Leader (Canton SD), January 15, 1904, December 9, 1904; Mitchell Capital (SD), December 16, 1904; International Good Templar 8(2) (February 1895), 37-38; “Biography of R.B. McClenon,” Memorial and biographical record; an illustrated compendium of biography… (Chicago: G. A. Ogle & Co., 1898), 284; SD Agricultural College, Annual Catalog (1907 and 1908), unpaginated; Botsford, Obituary Record of the Society of Alumni, Williams College, 1920-1921 (Williamstown MA: April 1921), 106; “Rufus Buel McClenon,” Findagrave.com].

International Good Templar 8(2) (February 1895), 37

Adeline W. McClenon (1854-1939) [Madison, Lake County] was a delegate to the W.C.T.U./S.D.E.S.A. convention in Aberdeen in September 1894. In October, she hosted a W.C.T.U. meeting for which the program was a debate on suffrage. In May 1895, she spoke on “the mother’s relation to the suffrage question” at a mother’s meeting on “the mother’s relation to reforms.” In November 1897, she was elected secretary for the local equal suffrage association [Madison Daily Leader (SD), September 6, 1894, October 2, 1894, May 1, 1895, November 12, 1897]. Adeline White was born in New York, her father was a newspaper man, she graduated from Vassar college in 1878, and she married Rufus B. McClenon in 1882. They lived in New York and Wisconsin before coming to Sioux Falls in 1889. In 1893, R.B. took a job in Madison. While in Madison, Adeline was very active in the W.C.T.U., serving as president of the local branch in 1894 and 1899, hosting meetings, serving as editor of their column in the Daily Leader, and was state chair for scientific temperance instruction in 1896. She was also active in the Good Templars and the Presbyterian church, with women’s groups and Sunday school. The McClenons moved to Huron in 1902, Brookings in 1904, and California in 1908. After her husband’s death, she moved in 1925 back to Walton, New York to live with her brother and his family [For instance: Madison Daily Leader (SD), July 11, 1894, September 19, 1894, October 13, 1894, April 19, 1895, July 16, 1895, December 17, 1895, January 30, 1896, June 15, 1896, February 1, 1897, July 29, 1897, August 31, 1899, September 2, 1904, April 20, 1908; Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, SD), September 18, 1896; Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), August 14, 1902; International Good Templar 9(12) (December 1896), 405; “Biography of R.B. McClenon,” Memorial and biographical record; an illustrated compendium of biography… (Chicago: G. A. Ogle & Co., 1898), 284; Botsford, Obituary Record of the Society of Alumni, Williams College, 1920-1921 (Williamstown MA: April 1921), 106; Vassar Quarterly 25(1) (October 1939), 30].

Linnie B. McCrossan (1869-1956) [Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County] hosted a suffrage meeting with organizer Perle Penfield in mid-October, ahead of the November 1909 state convention in Sioux Falls. During the convention, McCrossan served as secretary pro tem of the business meeting held for state workers and co-signed an invitation to Ulrikka F. Bruun of Chicago to come to speak in South Dakota [Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, SD), October 14, 1909, November 5, 1909; Madison Daily Leader (SD), October 18, 1909; Bruun, Sange, digte og rim (Chicago: J.W. Hanssen’s Bogtrykkeri, 1921), 241]. Later that spring of 1910, McCrossan was serving as chair of the expenditure committee for the state campaign and was elected a delegate to the national convention in April, but went to Europe and then resigned (a number of Sioux Falls leaders resigned) at the time that state leadership was breaking down [Philip Weekly Review (SD), April 28, 1910; Forty-second annual report of NAWSA, given at the Convention, held at Washington, D.C., April 14 to 19, inclusive (New York, 1910), 144; Page 5, Bulletin – votes for women, c1910, RA08427, Pyle Papers USD; Letter LB Johnson to Breeden, April 27, 1910, RD06626, correspondence 1910-01 – 1910-04, Johnson to campaign committee, RD06654, RD06664, and Campbell to Breeden, RD06668, correspondence 1910-05, Breeden papers USD]. Melinda Bell Jones was born in Cheyenne WY and lived in Spearfish when she married Bernard Carland McCrossan in 1886. They moved to Sioux Falls in 1887 and in 1898 incorporated the McCrossan Fruit Co., for which Linnie was positioned as vice-president. In 1903, B.C. died after years of illness (one article said breakdown from overwork). In 1908, the business was dissolved and sold. She later moved to New York City and Amarillo TX, but in the late 1940s funded the McCrossan Boys Ranch (still in operation) outside Sioux Falls [Sioux City Journal (IA), November 14, 1898; Madison Daily Leader (SD), June 24, 1901; Hot Springs Weekly Star (SD), November 13, 1903; Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), March 12, 1908; Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, SD), September 19, 1914, September 6, 1928, December 27, 1946, June 22, 1955; The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), June 26, 1955; Amarillo Globe-Times (TX), September 26, 1956, January 1, 1957; “Melinda Bell McCrossan,” Findagrave.com; “Bernard McCrossan Biography,” Robinson, History of South Dakota, vol. II (1904), 1488-1489].

Zadia McCulluch (McCullough?) [Presho, Lyman County] reported in the “Woman’s West of the River Suffrage Number” of the Rapid City Daily Journal (SD), October 26, 1914, page 8 about campaign work around Presho. She held neighborhood teas; distributed leaflets, The Messenger, and buttons; sent literature to teachers; appealed to pastors to preach on suffrage; gave four speeches; served lunches to raise money; arranged for talks by district president Rev. Katherine Powell and Anna Simmons; and gave a Corinthian dinner to which men were invited as a last plug before the election. They also planned to have women at polls in three townships.
I haven’t found much definitive about her – the spelling of her name might be throwing me off, or the lack of newspapers close to Presho… I did find a man Heber J. McCullough living in Montana who had married a woman in Presho — his parents were David and Zadia, and his family had homesteaded in Powder River MT in 1915… and there was a D.N. McCullough from Presho who was on the Prohibition party’s 1912 ticket, running for state land commissioner. There were a 1920 census record for them in Powder River, and a 1910 census record for them in Foster Twp., Beadle Co., SD [Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), October 17, 1912; Billings Gazette (MT), November 10, 1987].

Gertrude Richards McGee (1870-1967) [Rapid City, Pennington County] was in charge of the equal suffrage department for the local W.C.T.U. in 1895, was part of the organization of a suffrage club in Rapid City in 1909, and, with her daughter (also Gertrude), signed a 1918 petition for suffrage that was printed in the Journal [Black Hills Union (Rapid City SD), December 27, 1895, October 22, 1909; Rapid City Journal (SD), October 16, 1918]. Gertrude Richards was born in Dover DE and married Levi McGee in December 1917 [Sturgis Advertiser (SD), January 11, 1888; Kingsbury, History of Dakota Territory, vol. 5 (1915), 480-481; Post-Standard (Syracuse, NY), January 24, 1967; “Gertrude Richards McGee,” Findagrave.com]. She was active with the W.C.T.U. in 1895 as legislation/petition chair and treasurer [Black Hills Union (Rapid City SD), May 24, 1895, August 16, 1895]. In 1903, she ran on the Democratic ticket for the board of education [Black Hills Union (Rapid City SD), April 17, 1903, April 24, 1903]. In 1903-1920, she was active in the leadership of Rapid City’s Current Events Club, and the Black Hills and South Dakota Federations of Womens Clubs [Minneapolis Journal (MN), July 15, 1903; Black Hills Union and Western Stock Review (Rapid City SD), October 28, 1904, October 23, 1908; Hot Springs Weekly Star (SD), October 26, 1906; The Herald-Advance (Milbank SD), September 4, 1908; The Pioneer-Review (Philip SD), October 14, 1920; Register of Women’s Clubs (1921), 138]. McGee was also active in the Christian Science church [The Christian Science Journal 33(1) (1915), xxxiii; Post-Standard (Syracuse, NY), January 24, 1967]. During WWI, she was secretary of the women’s Committee of National Defense for Rapid City [Rapid City Journal (SD), January 16, 1918]. Her husband Levi was an attorney, judge, and state senator, who had come to the Black Hills in 1884 and also helped found a large power company [Kingsbury, 480-481].

“Postcard – Rapid City, Judge Levi McGee House, North Side of South Street 1100 Block, undated,” Clara Lobdell Collection, Leland D. Case Library for Western Historical Studies BHSU, Spearfish.

The McGees also lived at 1114 West Blvd. and 531 Kansas City St. [1910-1920 census, via Ancestry.com]

Rev. J.J. McIntire (1827-1902) [Hurley, Turner County] was corresponding secretary of the equal suffrage association formed at Hurley in April 1890 and participated in two of their debate programs. In the first, he was assigned to the negative side and “was obliged to handle his side of the question single handed… At the close of the debate Mr. McIntire apologized to the ladies present for what he had said, and wished them to understand that he was in favor of equal suffrage” [Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), April 10, 1890, April 17, 1890 (quote), April 24, 1890]. James Johnson McIntire was born in New York, married Sarah Swartz in 1850 in New York, and served as a chaplain in the 49th Wisconsin Infantry during the Civil War. In 1871, he came to Dakota Territory from Wisconsin, homesteading in Turner County and working as both postmaster for the settlement at Finlay and Baptist missionary for a network of area congregations. In 1873-1874, he was elected Turner County superintendent of schools, and in 1874-1876, he held of the office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction for the territory. In 1877, his wife Sarah died, and in 1878 he married Mina G. Vandemark of Sioux Falls. In 1879, the McIntires went to Shell Rock IA, but returned in about 1884, and he and his wife were the higher and primary teachers in Hurley. He was also chaplain for the state G.A.R. in 1890 and the Odd Fellows in 1894-1902. In 1890, they moved to Spencer IA. In 1899, he retired and moved to East Sioux Falls [Boston Post (MA), January 25, 1875; Daily Press and Dakotaian (Yankton SD), November 19, 1875, April 10, 1878; Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), January 8, 1885, April 2, 1885, April 30, 1885, June 13, 1889, December 25, 1902; Hot Springs Star (SD), March 28, 1890; Thomas Miles Shanafelt, The Baptist History of South Dakota (1899), 113-115 (includes his own account of early mission work), 139, 251; Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, SD, January 4, 1903, pt 1, pt 2; Kingsbury, History of Dakota Territory, vol. 5 (1915), 588-589; 1885-1900 census, via Ancestry; “Rev James Johnson McIntire” and “Sarah McIntire,” Findagrave.com].

Shanafelt, The Baptist History of South Dakota (1899), 112.

Mina G. McIntire (1849-1936) [Hurley, Turner County] participated in a debate event hosted by the suffrage association in Hurley in May 1890 and during the June school elections that year, served as clerk for the election board [Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), May 22, 1890, June 19, 1890]. Mina G. Vandemark married Rev. James Johnson McIntire in 1878 after his first wife passed in 1877. In 1879, the McIntires went to Shell Rock IA, but returned in about 1884, and were the higher and primary teachers in Hurley. Mina continued as primary teacher into 1892. In 1890, they moved to Spencer IA. In 1899, he retired and moved to East Sioux Falls. After her husband’s death in 1902, she lived a time with her son Lewis in Hartford and ended her days at the State Soldiers’ Home in Hot Springs [Daily Press and Dakotaian (Yankton SD), April 10, 1878; Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), December 31, 1885, February 4, 1892, December 25, 1902; Thomas Miles Shanafelt, The Baptist History of South Dakota (1899), 139; Kingsbury, History of Dakota Territory, vol. 5 (1915), 588-589; 1885-1920 census, via Ancestry; “Mina G McIntyre,” Findagrave.com].

S.T. May (1866-1929) [Madison, Lake County] was one of the speakers at the March 1910 suffrage symposium, where he “emphasized woman’s fitness for political responsibility,” and, in June 1916, he was a speaker at a suffrage meeting at the high school auditorium [Madison Daily Leader (SD), March 23, 1910, March 28, 1910, March 30, 1910, June 7, 1916, June 8, 1916]. Samuel Thomas May was born in Ohio, migrated to Iowa as a child with his family, and worked as a rural teacher as a young man. He married Martha Roach in 1891. He undertook further at the University of Iowa and the University of Illinois College of Law. He was superintendent of schools in Clarion and Hawarden IA before taking the same position in Madison SD in May 1909. A son served in the military during World War I. In September 1918, he took the position of president of the new normal school in Dickinson ND [Madison Daily Leader (SD), May 1, 1909, August 17, 1918, September 7, 1918, September 11, 1918; “Dr. Samuel T. May,” Dickinson State University Archive (includes photo); Photograph “Samuel T. May,” Southwestern North Dakota Digital Archives, Dickinson Museum; “Samuel Thomas May,” Findagrave.com].

Martha R. May (1867-1953) [Madison, Lake County] was secretary of the suffrage campaign committee for Lake County in early 1918 [McMahon? to Pyle, February 10, 1918, RD07747, correspondence 1918-02-09 to 1918-02-18, Pyle papers USD; Madison Daily Leader (SD), February 14, 1918]. Martha Myrtle Roach was born in Iowa, graduated from Valparaiso College in Indiana, and married Samuel T. May in 1891. They came to Madison from Hawarden IA when S.T. took the position of school superintendent there. In Madison, Martha also served as president of her district for the W.C.T.U. and the state W.C.T.U.’s state treasurer. A son served in the military during World War I. In September 1918, S.T. took the position of president of the new normal school in Dickinson ND, and they moved there. After her husband’s death in 1929, Martha moved to California and lived with sisters Grace and Margaret Ferenen until returning to Dickinson [Madison Daily Leader (SD), August 19, 1916, November 4, 1916, August 17, 1918, September 11, 1918; 1930-1940 census, via Ancestry.com; “Martha Myrtle ‘Mattie’ Roach May,” Findagrave.com (includes early photo)].

F.L. Mease (1860-1940) [Madison, Lake County] was editor of the Semi-Weekly Sentinel, and although a Republican paper that did not explicitly endorse suffrage during the first half of the campaign, he printed news about the movement. Then in April 1890, he printed interviews with local women about suffrage, saying “The Sentinel can see no valid reason why in this enlightened age the mothers, wives and sisters are not justly entitled to vote and are not equally as competent to exercise this great privilege and duty as the average male proportion of the commonwealth.  The use of the ballot would he perfectly safe in the discretion of South Dakota’s intelligent womanhood. It is asserted by the opposition, as a leading negative argument, that the majority of women do not want to vote. Even this weak assumption will be most effectually answered by the extent to which the women emphasize their claims during the campaign. At least, we believe that locally the cause will be best served and the men enlightened by a thorough discussion and free expression of opinions from the ladies of the community” [quoted in Jennings, “Lake County Woman Suffrage Campaign in 1890,” South Dakota History (1975), 394-396]. He and his wife were also part of the choir that performed at a Anna Howard Shaw lecture event in April 1890 in Madison [Madison Daily Leader (SD), April 21, 1890]. In 1897, F.L. “Mayes” (I think Mease) was a judge for the oratory contest held with the state suffrage convention in Mitchell [Mitchell Capital (SD), October 1, 1897]. Still editor of the Sentinel in 1918, he printed: “Every voter has received a copy of the amendments and referred laws. Look them over before you go into the booth, and don’t forget to vote yes on Amendment E, which gives the vote to women, but denies it to aliens” [Jennings, “Lake County,” 409].

Frank Leslie Mease was born in Iowa, attended the state university there, came to Mitchell (Dak. Terr.) in 1882 working for the railroad, became editor of the Sentinel in 1886 and married Nora Scoggin in 1889. He was an active member of the Methodist church and its choir, as were the Hagers, and his wife was active in the W.C.T.U. Mease was part of the leadership of the South Dakota Press (Editorial) Association in 1890-1892 and 1913, was active in the Republican party in 1890-1898, and published the State Journal of Education in the early 1900s. He was also involved in temperance, the Knights of Pythias, the Madison Commercial Club, the Chautauqua. Mease retired from the Sentinel in 1931. In 1939, the Meases moved to California [For instance: Kimball Graphic (SD), November 5, 1886, November 29, 1889; Hot Springs Star (SD), August 8, 1890; Madison Daily Leader (SD), September 30, 1890, November 2, 1891, May 24, 1892, September 17, 1897, July 23, 1898, March 23, 1899, March 1, 1901, April 19, 1905, May 8, 1905, July 8, 1912, October 22, 1913, March 4, 1918, September 21, 1918, January 5, 1921; The Herald-Advance (Milbank SD), August 5, 1892; Dakota Farmers’ Leader (Canton SD), February 14, 1913; Memorial and Biographical Record: An Illustrated Compendium of Biography of South Dakota (Chicago: Geo. A. Ogle & Co., 1898), 349-350; Kingsbury, History of Dakota Territory, vol. 4 (1915), 932-933; Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), November 9, 1931; Evening Huronite (SD), May 16, 1940; Jennings, “Lake County,” 390-393; “Frank Leslie Mease,” Findagrave.com].

Nora Scoggin Mease (1869-after 1948) [Madison, Lake County] was part of the choir that performed in the opening of Anna Howard Shaw’s lecture in Madison in April 1890, with her husband and her sister, Lillie (Hubbell) [Madison Daily Leader (SD), April 21, 1890]. Nora Scoggin was born in Wisconsin, came to Iowa with her family in 1872, and married Frank Leslie Mease in 1889. She was active in the W.C.T.U. and was involved with starting a kindergarten in 1896. She was an active member of the Methodist church and its choir, as were the Hagers. During WWI, she was chair of a fundraising committee for the Army Y.M.C.A., served on the county committee for food conservation, and was active with the Red Cross. The Meases moved to California in 1939, and after her husband’s death in 1940, she lived a time with her son in Memphis [Madison Daily Leader (SD), August 13, 1896, January 4, 1912, September 3, 1917, October 20, 1917, March 1, 1918; Memorial and Biographical Record: An Illustrated Compendium of Biography of South Dakota (Chicago: Geo. A. Ogle & Co., 1898), 349-350; Evening Huronite (SD), May 16, 1940; 1948 Memphis city directory, via Ancestry.com; Jennings, “Lake County Woman Suffrage Campaign in 1890,” South Dakota History (1975), 393].

Gov. Arthur C. Mellette (1842-1896) [Watertown, Codington County] supported school suffrage for women while he was serving as a delegate to the 1883 statehood constitutional convention in Sioux Falls, saying: “I think the report of the committee is all right.  There is a fairness in allowing a mother to vote upon matters pertaining to the education of her children.  She can do it intelligently.  She has no superior in such a qualification.  It should not be laughed down” [Press and daily Dakotaian (Yankton SD), September 14, 1883]. In 1889, at the first graduation ceremony for the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks (a class of eight students), Mellette (then territorial governor) gave a speech that supported suffrage for women, saying: “I notice in this class that the ladies outnumber the gentlemen six to two.  The granting of the ballot to women will be the next step in advance in the political development of our land.  Equal as she is in education, an added power will be given her with the ballot in her hand.  The emancipated slave can vote, but he can deny the ballot to Harriet Beecher Stowe, his emancipator.  I hope to see the day when the ladies of Dakota will walk side by side with men to the ballot-box to express their opinion upon all questions” [Wessington Springs Herald (SD), July 12, 1889]. While state governor (1890 to 1893), his support of suffrage was a matter of significance during the 1890 ballot campaign [Wessington Springs Herald (SD), February 21, 1890, March 28, 1890; Madison Daily Leader (SD), April 10, 1890; Omaha Daily Bee (NE)., June 2, 1890; Iola Register (KS), July 11, 1890; Anthony et al., History of Woman Suffrage vol. 4, 559]. In 1893, the NAWSA’s Committee on Governors’ Opinions sent out letters of inquiry to each state: “Governor Mellette, of South Dakota, says: ‘I believe in woman suffrage on the same basis as man'” [Upton, Proceedings of the 25th Annual Convention of NAWSA, held in Washington, D.C., January 16-19, 1893 (Washington DC) 1893), 89].

Arthur Calvin Mellette was born in Indiana, served in the Civil War, married Margaret Wylie and graduated from law school in 1866, was a member of the Indiana house of representatives in 1871-1875, came to Dakota Territory as land office register in 1883 (or 1879), and was appointed governor of Dakota Territory in 1889. In 1895, he faced financial ruin—he served as bondsman of state treasurer W.W. Taylor who had stolen funds and ran away. Much of Mellette’s assets and property were used to fill the bond. He had also lost his oldest son Wylie (an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at SDSU) to suicide in 1894. Mellette moved to Pittsburg, Kansas, and his own health grew increasingly poor before his death in 1896 [Hot Springs Weekly Star (SD), May 29, 1896; Dakota Farmers’ Leader (Canton SD), May 29, 1896; “Arthur Calvin Mellette” and “Margaret ‘Maggie’ Wylie Mellette,” Findagrave.com; “Arthur C. Mellette,” Wikipedia; David B. Miller, “Dakota Images: Arthur C. Mellette,” South Dakota History 19(1) (1989), 132-133; “Arthur C. Mellette portrait,” c.1888-1890, A2858, State Historical Society of North Dakota]. The Mellette House in Watertown was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in August 1976 and is a museum.

Dakota Farmers’ Leader (Canton SD), May 29, 1896.

Dr. H.N. Merrick (1843-1918) [Onida, Sully County] spoke at an equal suffrage meeting in Onida in January 1891 [Sully County Watchman (Onida SD), January 24, 1891]. Henry N. Merrick was born in Pennsylvania, served in the PA Infantry in 1861-1864, and married Melissa J. Pierce. They moved from Canton PA to Onida in the spring of 1886. They were founding members of the Baptist church in 1889, and Henry spoke at least one W.C.T.U. meeting. While also managing farm acreages on homesteaded and purchased land, Merrick also practiced dentistry. He was nominated by the Independent party for county coroner in 1892 and served as a township election judge in 1893. In 1895, the Merricks moved to Pierre and to Kansas by 1902, where he was in practice with his daughter Louise [For instance: Canton Independent-Sentinel (PA), April 16, 1886; Sully County Watchman (Onida SD), July 20, 1889, December 7, 1889, June 7, 1890, March 5, 1892, October 29, 1892, October 20, 1893; Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), April 18, 1895, October 3, 1895; Robinson Index (KS), May 22, 1902; Highland Vidette (KS), September 17, 1908; Huron Herald (KS), October 7, 1909, October 10, 1912; Severance News (KS), December 3, 1909; Civil Ward Records/Profiles, 1880-1910 census, via Ancestry.com “Henry N. Merrick,” Findagrave.com].

Dr. Louise Merrick (1868-1964) [Onida, Sully County] provided music for a suffrage rally entertainment at Blunt in November 1890 and was made treasurer of the re-organized Onida equal suffrage club in January 1891 [Sully County Watchman (Onida SD), November 1, 1890, January 24, 1891]. Louise Merrick was born in Illinois and came to South Dakota with her family in 1886. She was the daughter of Henry and Melissa Merrick and sister of Raymond Merrick (also listed here). As a young woman, Merrick taught music at a “colored missionary school” in Alabama in November 1889-May 1890 and taught at the Pierre Indian Industrial School in 1891. She also participated in WCTU meetings in Onida from 1890-1893. She married a cousin William C. Merrick in California in the spring of 1894; W.C. was a dentist by occupation. They lived a time in Kansas City MO, but the marriage ended at some point between 1899 and 1902. By 1902, she was working as a dentist with her father in Kansas, she also worked in Huron KS. In 1910, she married William N. Reece but that marriage ended somehow too. Still working as a dentist, in 1920, she lived in Iowa KS with her children and mother; and in 1930 and 1940, she lived in Kansas City MO [For instance: Sully County Watchman (Onida SD), November 2, 1889, May 3, 1890, June 14, 1890, June 21, 1890, December 6, 1890, February 7, 1891, October 17, 1891, March 10, 1893, June 1, 1894; Kansas City Journal (MO), February 22, 1899, June 15, 1899; Robinson Index (KS), May 22, 1902; Highland Vidette (KS), September 17, 1908; Huron Herald (KS), October 7, 1909, October 10, 1912; Brown County World (Hiawatha, KS), October 25, 1912; 1900-1940 census, via Ancestry.com; “Louise Merrick,” Findagrave.com].

Melissa J. Merrick (1847-1930) [Onida, Sully County] was secretary of the Sully County equal suffrage association at its organization in August 1890. She continued to be active with the suffrage association at its meetings in 1891, and was involved with a fundraising event for the Colorado state campaign held by the Onida suffrage association in 1893 [Sully County Watchman (Onida SD), August 23, 1890, February 14, 1891, June 13, 1891, May 2, 1891, April 25, 1891, June 6, 1891, September 29, 1893]. Melissa Jane Pierce was born in Illinois and married Civil War veteran and dentist Henry N. Merrick. They moved from Canton PA to Onida in the spring of 1886. They were founding members of the Baptist church in 1889, and Melissa was a delegate to the Baptist Association’s session in 1891. From 1889 to 1893, Merrick was active with the local W.C.T.U., holding offices of vice-president, corresponding secretary, and delegate to the district conventions. She was also active with the local literary club. In 1895, the Merricks moved to Pierre and to Kansas by 1902, where her husband was in practice with their daughter Louise. After husband’s death in 1918, she lived with her children’s families in Kansas [Canton Independent-Sentinel (PA), April 16, 1886; Sully County Watchman (Onida SD), July 20, 1889, July 27, 1889, January 4, 1890, January 11, 1890, August 3, 1889, June 7, 1890, August 16, 1890, June 20, 1891, July 23, 1892, March 3, 1893, May 5, 1893, July 21, 1893; Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), February 28, 1895; Saturday News (Watertown SD), May 31, 1917; 1880-1930 census, via Ancestry.com; “Melissa Jane Pierce Merrick,” Findagrave.com].

Raymond H. Merrick (1876-?) [Onida, Sully County] presented a declamation at a meeting of the Onida equal suffrage association in January 1891 [Sully County Watchman (Onida SD), January 24, 1891]. Raymond was the son of Henry and Melissa and sister of Louise listed above. He frequently offered musical performances for local W.C.T.U. performances. He graduated from Western Dental college in Kansas City MO in 1899. He practiced in Missouri and Kansas, where his parents also ended up living [Kansas City Journal (MO), April 3, 1899; Sully County Watchman (Onida SD), January 9, 1892, March 5, 1892, January 7, 1893; Sisseton Weekly Standard (SD), August 25, 1911; 1900-1930 census, via Ancestry.com].

Mrs. Frank Meyer [Huron, Beadle County] was secretary/stenographer for Mamie Pyle at the South Dakota Universal Franchise League’s Huron headquarters in the 1918 campaign. In December 1918, as the U.F.L. looked to pay off its debts from the campaign, Meyer was let go and Pyle closed the office to reduce expenses [Saturday News (Watertown SD), April 18, 1918; Pyle to Stevens, December 27, 1918, RA12071-RA12073, Box 4, Correspondence, 1918, December, Pyle Papers USD].
{The frustrating thing is I can’t find much about her otherwise — there was a Frank W. and Verna I in the 1918 Huron city directory–her occupation was given as stenographer for W.H. Maul. Verna Izetta Wood (Meyer) was also born in Huron, and Frank W and Verna later lived in Hecla/Aberdeen [1916-1918 Huron directories and 1924-1954 Aberdeen directories, via Ancestry.com; “Verna Izetta Wood Meyer,” and “Frank Wolfgang Meyer,” Findagrave.com]}.

“As much as any other one person Mrs. Frank Meyer, office secretary, contributed to the success of the campaign. Absolutely reliable, absolutely untiring, she kept everything moving for everybody”
McMahon, “How to Win a State,” The Woman Citizen 3 (November 16, 1918), 509.

After the election, Pyle wrote: “Mrs. Meyer and I are rather lonely here at the office, trying to close things up.”
Pyle to McMahon, November 12, 1918, RA11807, Box 4, Correspondence, 1918, November 8-14, Pyle Papers USD.

Fanny F. Millett (1867-1949) [Ft. Pierre, Stanley County] served on the executive committee of the county suffrage campaign in 1914 and 1918, the latter as chair [Woman’s West of the River Suffrage Number, Rapid City Daily Journal (SD), October 26, 1914, page 3; Pyle to Porter, November 4, 1918, RA11671, Johnson to Pyle, November 5, 1918, RA11684, Porter to Pyle, November 6, 1918, RA11713-RA11714, Millett to Pyle, December 8, 1918, RA12040, and Pyle to Millett, December 28, 1918, RA12080, Box 4, Correspondence, 1918, November 1-7, Pyle Papers USD]. Also in 1918, she served as the county chair for the Liberty Loan Committee [Report of National woman’s liberty loan committee (1918), 152]. Fanny W. Ford was born in New York and married Charles Lincoln Millett in September 1887 in Belfast NY. Millett had started work in Pierre that past April. In 1890, they claimed land across the river on the newly-opened Great Sioux Reservation, and had a stock operation. Her husband also was a founding director and president of the Stock Growers Bank in Ft. Pierre in 1890, and several other area banks in the county. C.L. also served a term as state representative in 1910 and was a director of the S.D. Anti-Saloon League. After her husband’s death in 1923, she lived with her daughter Helen Evans’ family in Flandreau and then in Lawrence KS, where her son-in-law worked as vocational supervisor for the Haskell Institute [Philip Weekly Review (SD), October 27, 1910, February 23, 1911, June 13, 1912, October 2, 1919; Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), October 12, 1916; The Pioneer (Philip SD), April 4, 1918; Who’s who in Finance and Banking (1922), 472; 1870-1940 census, via Ancestry.com; “Fanny W. Ford Millett,” Findagrave.com; “Stockgrowers Bank,” NPS Travel Itinerary].

Ella V. Milliken (c.1852-?) [Alpena, Jerauld County] was one of the Alpena representatives to the Jerauld County equal suffrage convention in May 1890, and their contingent brought Susan B. Anthony and Matilda Hindman to speak in Alpena after the convention. After the 1890 election, she shared a talk on “What shall we do in the present emergency?” at a W.C.T.U. meeting in Wessington Springs; it was afterwards published in the Herald (quotes following) [Wessington Springs Herald (SD), May 16, 1890, May 23, 1890, November 21, 1890, November 28, 1890]. Ella Viola Thomas was born in New York and married James R. Milliken. She was the head for Alpena and the county vice-president of the W.C.T.U. in 1889-1890. In 1893 and 1896, she superintended the Demorest gold medal contest for oratory for the state W.C.T.U. conventions. The Millikens moved to Mitchell in 1895, to Sioux City in 1897, back to Mitchell in 1902, back to Alpena in 1903, and back to Sioux City by 1907. Her husband dealt in cattle and real estate, was an officer of the Bank of Alpena, and ran a mercantile; he was also active in the local Republican party and served as a state senator for Jerauld and Buffalo Counties in 1892 [Wessington Springs Herald (SD), September 17, 1886, May 18, 1888, August 9, 1889, May 23, 1890, July 18, 1890; Madison Daily Leader (SD), September 7, 1893; Mitchell Capital (SD), December 2, 1892, October 25, 1895, July 30, 1897, July 25, 1902, May 29, 1903, August 2, 1907; Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls SD), September 18, 1896; The Citizen-Republican (Scotland SD), April 7, 1904; Dunham, History of Jerauld County, 194, 197, 207, 226, 236, J.R.’s photo in 237, 292; Kingsbury, History of Dakota Territory, vol. 2 (1915), 1577; Lineage Book – National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution 41 (1915), 121; 1900-1915 federal and state censuses, via Ancestry.com].

Ella Milliken in November 1890 —
“The Equal Suffrage sentiment in South Dakota will never go back where it was before this campaign began.”
“We know that we have done what we could, and there is a consolation in feeling, that, although we did not win the prize, we know that we were worthy of it.”
She told a story of a girl wanting to go to work in the barn with her father. Her father refused her but took her brother with him. Milliken reflected: “The boy feels that he is entitled to greater privileges than his sister, because he is a boy.  The girl feels that she is denied a privilege, because she is a girl.  That man (the father) told me that he voted for equal suffrage, and I believe that he did.  His thoughtless words were but the expression of that wrong idea that has governed the world ever since the exodus from Eden.  And that is the idea that we must eradicate before we can reach ultimate success… You cannot begin too soon to impress upon the young mind the idea of equality and justice.”
Wessington Springs Herald (SD), November 28, 1890.

Captain Nelson Miner (1824-1879) [Vermillion, Clay County] introduced a suffrage bill in the Council of the territorial legislature in February 1879. Though it passed the Council by one vote, it was indefinitely postponed in the House [Daily Press and Dakotaian (Yankton SD), February 3, 1879, February 4, 1879; Canton Advocate (SD), February 13, 1879]. Nelson Preston Miner was born in Ohio, attended Oberlin College, organized a company of men to look for gold in California, and married Cordelia Gates. They went to Adel IA in 1852 and came to Dakota Territory with their young family in 1860 (before the territory was organized). He opened the hotel St. Nicholas and was also a lawyer. In 1862, he was put in charge of Company A of the 1st Dakota Cavalry, a volunteer unit organized to fight the Dakota/Lakota in the U.S.-Dakota War under General Sully. He was commissioned a Captain by Gov. Jayne in 1861. After 1865, he re-opened the hotel and was appointed the Register at the U.S. Land Office in Vermillion from 1865 to 1879. He was elected to the territorial legislatures in 1870, 1873, 1877, and 1879 [Daily Press and Dakotaian (Yankton SD), April 28, 1876, April 29, 1876, August 6, 1876, January 24, 1877, November 17, 1877, December 5, 1878, January 6, 1879, January 14, 1879, October 23, 1879, October 24, 1879, November 10, 1879, February 4, 1880, April 26, 1880; Lincoln County Advocate (Canton SD), October 18, 1876; Kingsbury, History of Dakota Territory, vol. 2, 1105-1106, and vol. 5 (1915), 1139; “Nelson Miner,” Findagrave.com].

Photograph – carte de visite, “Nelson Miner,” RA00294, Beede Family Papers, Richardson Collection, USD.

Eva K. Mohr (1868-1960) [Alexandria, Hanson County] was chair of the county campaign committee in 1918, and as such worked with national organizers McMahon and Watkins to recruit workers and raise money. In 1920, she was elected to chair the finance committee for the First district chapter of the League of Women Voters [McMahon? to Mohr, March 7, 1918, RD08135, correspondence 1918-03-01 to 1918-03-11; Watkins to McMahon, November 5, 1918, RA11696, Box 4, Correspondence, 1918, November 1-7; and Mohr to Pyle, December 9, 1918, RA12042, Box 4, Correspondence, 1918, December, Pyle papers USD; Madison Daily Leader (SD), September 11, 1920; Sisseton Weekly Standard (SD), September 17, 1920]. Eva Keith was born in Iowa and came to Mitchell with her family in 1884. She graduated from Mitchell high school in 1887 and worked as a teacher. In 1893, she married attorney Henry J. Mohr. They moved to Parkston in 1900 and Alexandria in 1901, where her husband was county judge. She was later involved with the Parent-Teacher Association, serving as state recording secretary in 1915-1916; the W.C.T.U.; the Red Cross; and the American Legion Auxiliary. In the 1890s, her husband was involved with Democrat, Independent, and Populist politics at a county level [Mitchell Capital (SD), March 11, 1887, December 2, 1887, October 12, 1888, August 22, 1890, September 23, 1892, November 4, 1892, May 4, 1894, August 31, 1894, July 16, 1897, September 23, 1898, September 7, 1900, July 26, 1901, November 17, 1905, September 11, 1908, September 25, 1908, August 1, 1912, June 24, 1915, November 23, 1916, September 6, 1917; Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, SD), January 14, 1943; “Eva Keith Mohr,” Findagrave.com].

Quincy Lee Morrow (1869-1919) [Brookings, Brookings County] endorsed suffrage “as an easy solution of the liquor question” in January 1910 and, also that month, included Lydia Johnson (SDESA president) on the program of the Davison County prohibition party convention [Mitchell Capital (SD), January 27, 1910, pg.3, pg.10]. In June 1913, he made an address on “Equal Suffrage” for a meeting of the State Grange at the state college [Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), June 26, 1913]. Morrow was born in Maryland and became a national lecturer/organizer for the Prohibition party, having worked in Arizona, Arkansas, Texas, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Colorado, and South Dakota before taking the position of state secretary for the SD Prohibition Party and moving to Brookings by January 1905 [Backbone (St Paul MN), March 1, 1902, September 1, 1902, September 1, 1904, May 1, 1905; Saint Paul Globe (MN), October 11, 1902, November 16, 1903; Mitchell Capital (SD), November 6, 1903; Forest City Press (SD), January 26, 1905; Madison Daily Leader (SD), February 1, 1905]. As state secretary/chair, he lectured frequently around the state and published a party newspaper (the Beacon Light in 1905 and the Northwestern Patriot in 1910). He was also on the party ticket for US Senator in 1912 [Forest City Press (SD), March 30, 1905; Madison Daily Leader (SD), April 28, 1910; Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), April 25, 1912; Saturday News (Watertown SD), May 16, 1912]. In 1913, he resigned the state secretary position and moved to Baltimore MD and then Minneapolis MN to work again at the national level [Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), January 16, 1913; Mitchell Capital (SD), September 11, 1913; Virginia Enterprise (MN), July 31, 1914; D.L. Conklin, “South Dakota Comrades Adopting Novel Plans,” American Advance 1(34) (November 18, 1911), 6; “Quincy Lee Morrow,” Findagrave.com].

Backbone (St Paul MN), May 1, 1905.

Eva C. Myers (1853-1939) [Canistota, McCook County] was a speaker at the 1894 Lake Madison Chautauqua for the W.C.T.U.’s School of Methods day with Alice Pickler and Helen Barker [Madison Daily Leader (SD), July 20, 1894]. In September 1895, she was elected vice-president of the state Equal Suffrage Association under president Anna Simmons [Saint Paul Globe (Saint Paul, MN), September 18, 1895; Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), September 19, 1895; et al.]. In December 1896, she was a signatory on the call for a state convention in Salem [Hot Springs Weekly Star (SD), December 4, 1896]. Eva C. March was born in Ohio and married Henry L. Myers. They came to Dakota Territory in about 1881 [1900-1910 censuses, via Ancestry.com]. In 1895-1896, Myers was very active with the W.C.T.U. [Madison Daily Leader (SD), May 23, 1895, May 24, 1895, May 23, 1896]. The Myers’ were still in Canistota in 1904, but then I lose track of them in records until Eva’s death certificate in Cedar Rapids IA [The Citizen-Republican (Scotland SD), July 7, 1904; Iowa Death Records, via Ancestry.com].