Biographies of Women’s Suffrage – F

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Alexander Fader (1849-1919) [Wentworth, Lake County] was secretary of the Wentworth Equal Suffrage Association in 1890 [Madison Daily Leader (SD), September 2, 1890].  Fader was a farmer in rural Lake County [Madison Daily Leader (SD), October 6, 1890; June 15, 1905; “Alexander Fader,” Find-a-grave.com].

Arthur Boyce Fairbank (1873-1936) [Huron / Sioux Falls] served as secretary of the men’s female suffrage club organized in Sioux Falls in 1916 [Argus Leader (Sioux Falls SD), September 28, 1916].  Arthur Boyce Fairbank, an attorney, married Lorena King in 1906 [Lead Daily Call (SD), July 10, 1974; “Arthur Boyce Fairbank,” Find-a-grave.com].

Lorena King Fairbank (1874-1979) [Huron / Sioux Falls] served as treasurer and on executive “committee of five” for the SD Votes for Women Campaign in 1909-1912.  In 1912, she was a member of the national committee.  In 1917, she was elected one of three vice-chairs of the state board of the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage.  More in link.

Ferne V. Farnham (1884-1951) [Newell, Butte County] provided music for a suffrage rally with Nina Pettigrew at the Theatorium in Newell in 1914 [“Then ‘n Now,” Rapid City Journal (SD), October 28, 2014].  When state organizers were planning for the 1918, Farnham was one of the women recommended by Pettigrew to be involved in a local suffrage committee [Pettigrew to Pyle, February 14, 1918, RD07820, correspondence 1918-02-09 to 1918-02-18, Pyle papers USD].  Ferne Hager married Ora E. Farnham, an attorney active with the local and national Water Users’ Associations [State Journal (Lincoln NE), July 11, 1915; Hot Springs Weekly Star (SD), May 12, 1916; “Ferne Hager Farnham,” Find-a-grave.com].

Mary Noyes Farr (1853-1938) [Pierre, Hughes County] was active with the Federation of Women’s Clubs and the W.C.T.U. in 1913 and 1915 when they supported suffrage, and she was one of the women to advocate for a suffrage vote at the 1915 legislature [Husted v.6 (1922), 590]. Farr was also involved with the Pierre League of Women Voters in 1924 [Weekly Pioneer-Times (Deadwood, SD), November 19, 1924].  Mary Noyes married Colonel Edward P. Farr in 1882 and they moved to Harrold in 1883, where she ran a millinery business [Henry Harrison Metcalf, New Hampshire Women: A Collection of Portraits and Biographical Sketches (Concord: New Hampshire Publishing, 1895), 47; Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, SD), January 3, 1938; Daily Capitol Journal (Pierre SD), January 3, 1938; “Mary Noyes Farr,” Find-a-grave.com].  After moving to Pierre in 1889, Farr had an art studio, was head of the art department at Pierre University, was principal of Lincoln schools, and was one of two women selected to be delegates to the 1895 National Educators’ Association meeting in Denver [Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), October 22, 1891; July 4, 1895; Metcalf, New Hampshire Women, 47; Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, SD), January 3, 1938].  In 1893, Farr coordinated the Pierre submissions and South Dakota’s educational exhibit for the World’s Fair in Chicago [Madison Daily Leader (SD), April 15, 1893; Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), March 30, 1893; Metcalf, New Hampshire Women, 47].

mary noyes farr
Metcalf, New Hampshire Women, 47.

In 1899, Farr became an osteopathic doctor and served on the state board of osteopathic medicine [The Osteopathic Physician v.11(3) (March 1907), 3; California Occupational Licenses, Registers, and Directories (1907), Ancestry.com; Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), April 18, 1907May 11, 1911; Lemmon Herald (SD), December 27, 1916].  She also piloted legislation for osteopathy in 1907 [The Osteopathic Physician v.15(4) (April 1909), 13].  Farr also held offices with several organizations including the A.O.U.W. from at least 1907 to 1911, the Women’s Relief Corps from 1902 to 1913 (including senior vice-president of the national W.R.C. from 1904 to 1906), the Order of the Eastern Star from 1904 to 1906, the local literary and woman’s clubs in 1908 to 1914, and the W.C.T.U. from 1913 to 1916 [For instance: Forest City Press (SD), June 23, 1904Mitchell Capital (SD), June 29, 1906May 31, 1907; Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), August 25, 1904, June 21, 1906, April 7, 1910May 25, 1911, January 16, 1913, October 2, 1913April 9, 1914, September 22, 1916; Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), July 10, 1902; Daily Capitol Journal (Pierre SD), January 3, 1938].  In 1904, the Farrs built their house at 106 E. Wynoka St. in Pierre, planning to use it in part as a hospital [“Farr House,” Pierre/Fort Pierre, NPS Heritage Travel Itinerary].  In 1917, Col. Farr took the position of commandant at the state Soldiers’ Home and the Farrs moved to Hot Springs [Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), May 17, 1917; Madison Daily Leader (SD), May 19, 1917; Daily Capitol Journal (Pierre SD), January 3, 1938].  Farr returned to Pierre after her husband’s death in 1923 [“Mary Noyes Farr,” Find-a-grave.com].

Gertrude I. Feige [Coursey] (1881-1961) [Huron, Beadle County] was the chair of Education for the SD League of Women Voters in 1925. She became the SDLWV president in 1926-1931 and served as a delegate to the national convention in 1926, 1929, and 1930. In 1932-1935, she was the Fifth Region director for the League of Women Voters U.S. [The Discerning Voter 1(3) (October 1925), 2-3, 1(8) (April 1926), 21(9) (May 1926), 1-3; The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), February 16, 1929, May 21, 1929, April 5, 1930, November 1, 1930, May 9, 1931, September 1, 1932, December 14, 1933, May 8, 1934, November 22, 1935]. Gertrude Irene Pearce was born in Illinois in 1881 and came to Woonsocket, SD with her family in about 1881. She married Dr. Ernest W. Feige in 1899 [The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), June 6, 1930, November 10, 1961]. In 1936, she ran for county commissioner [The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), November 4, 1936]. The Feiges lived at 319 3rd St SW in Huron with E.W.’s mother Dr. Freide Van Dalsem, and Gertrude hosted several LWV meetings at the house [The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), December 7, 1929, June 6, 1930, October 28, 1930, November 19, 1931, November 10, 1961; 1920-1930 census via Ancestry.com]. E.W. Feige died in 1936, and in 1943, Gertrude married Oscar W. Coursey of Mitchell. He died in 1947 [The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), November 10, 1961]. After women were given the right to sit on juries, she was the first name drawn of thirty-two women who were selected for the federal petit jury in Deadwood in 1947 [The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), August 10, 1947]. She was a member of the Christian Science church, the Order of the Eastern Star, and the P.E.O. Sisterhood, the Pioneer Daughters (of which she had been president), and the Democratic party [Huron Daily Plainsman (SD), April 19, 1950; The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), November 10, 1961]. Also: “Gertrude Irene Feige Coursey,” Findagrave.com.

Allen R. Fellows (1866-1926) [Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County] was on the executive committee of the men’s female suffrage club in 1916 and wrote SDUFL president Mamie Pyle a letter of congratulations in November 1918 when the state amendment passed [Argus Leader (Sioux Falls SD), September 28, 1916; Fellows to Pyle, November 7, 1918, RA11723, Box 4, Correspondence, 1918, November 1-7, Pyle Papers USD].  Fellows was an official of the Brown Drug Company and active in the Republican party [Mitchell Capital (SD), August 6, 1914; Sisseton Weekly Standard (SD), September 22, 1916Northwestern Druggist 30 (1922), 38 (includes photo); Kingsbury, History of Dakota Territory, vol. 4 (1915), 827].  He was involved in plans for the visits of both former President Roosevelt in 1910 and President Wilson in 1919, the latter as president of the Sioux Falls Commercial Club [Madison Daily Leader (SD), July 30, 1910, August 25, 1919; Harold H. Schuler, “Patriotic Pageantry: Presidential Visits to South Dakota,” South Dakota History 30(4) (Winter 2000), 353].  In 1918, he was appointed to the state Council of Defense [Madison Daily Leader (SD), April 19, 1918].   Allen R. Fellows married Harriet Le Fever in 1888 [Kingsbury, History of Dakota, 827; Jared Fellows, “Biography of Harriet E. Fellows, 1866-1956,” Biographical Database of Militant Suffragists, 1913–1920. Database assembled and introduction by Jill Zahniser].

* Hattie E. Fellows (1866-1956) [Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County] was chair of the state board of the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage when it was organized in January 1917 and continued in the role through 1920 [The Suffragist (National Women’s Party) (January 24, 1917), 8; Suffragist 8(5) (June 1920), 108].  In October 1917, Fellows made the arrangements for national organizers Jane Pincus and Mabel Vernon to speak at the Quaker Tea Room and presided over the meeting [The Suffragist (National Women’s Party) 5(94) (November 10, 1917), 8; Argus Leader (Sioux Falls SD), November 1, 1917].  In 1920, she represented South Dakota at a women’s conference in Chicago to discuss the continuing work of getting the final states to ratify the federal suffrage amendment [Argus Leader (Sioux Falls SD), June 2, 1920].  Harriet Le Fever married druggist Allen R. Fellows in 1888 [Kingsbury, History of Dakota Territory, vol. 4 (1915), 827; “Harriet E. LeFever Fellows,” Find-a-grave.com; Jared Fellows, “Biography of Harriet E. Fellows, 1866-1956,” Biographical Database of Militant Suffragists, 1913–1920. Database assembled and introduction by Jill Zahniser].

Mrs. A.R. Fellows,” photograph by Edmonston (Washington D.C.), LOC, Location: National Woman’s Party Records, Group II, Container II:274, Folder: Individual Photographs Nos. 119-133 “F”.  Cropped version of the photograph published in The Suffragist 8(5) (June 1920), 98.

Hubbard F. Fellows Jr. (1887-1974) [Sioux Falls / Rapid City] was on the executive committee of the men’s female suffrage club in 1916 [Argus Leader (Sioux Falls SD), September 28, 1916].  Fellows was an attorney and married Hazel G. Whiting in 1914. He had grown up in Plankinton [Forest City Press (SD), May 2, 1912Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls SD), October 1, 1927; 1900 census and SD Marriage Index, Ancestry.com; “Hubbard Fellows,” Find-a-grave.com].

Hazel G. Fellows (c1890-1987) [Sioux Falls / Rapid City] was secretary at the organization of the state board of the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage in January 1917 and assisted in arranging the meeting for national organizers Jane Pincus and Mabel Vernon to speak at the Quaker Tea Room [Argus Leader (Sioux Falls SD), November 1, 1917; The Suffragist (National Women’s Party) (January 24, 1917), 8; The Suffragist (National Women’s Party) 5(94) (November 10, 1917), 8].  Fellows became a lawyer and went into practice with her husband (though I’m struggling to find corroboration) [The Suffragist (National Women’s Party) (January 24, 1917), 8].  Hazel G. Whiting married Hubbard F. Fellows Jr. in 1914 [South Dakota marriage index, Ancestry.com; “Hazel Fellows,” Find-a-grave.com].

FellowsMrsHF
The Suffragist (National Women’s Party) (January 24, 1917), 8

Sara Ferguson (c1858-__) [Parkston, Hutchinson County] served on a committee for the Parkston Woman Suffrage Campaign [Winter to Pyle, January 14, 1918, RD07567, correspondence 1918-01, and Winter to Pyle, December 4, 1918, RA12022, Box 4, Correspondence, 1918, December, Pyle papers USD].  Ferguson was a high school teacher in Parkston [Mitchell Capital (SD), June 7, 1917; 1920 census, Liberty Township, Hutchinson County, via Ancestry.com].  There was also a Sara Ferguson who was on the faculty of Scotland Academy in 1886-1891 and involved with the W.C.T.U., and one who grew up in Hurley, Turner County, in 1898-1903 [Mitchell Capital (SD), December 10, 1886; Press and Daily Dakotaian (Yankton SD), April 28, 1887; Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), September 10, 1891October 6, 1898, June 5, 1902, June 18, 1903; Herbert T. Hoover and Carol Goss Hoover, eds., Bon Homme County History (Freeman SD: Pine Hill Press, 1994), 218].

Sarah A. Fewins (1856-1943) [Aberdeen, Brown County] was elected secretary on the formation of an equal suffrage league in Aberdeen in 1914 [Dakota Farmers’ Leader (Canton SD), May 22, 1914, June 26, 1914; Madison Daily Leader (SD), June 17, 1914; et al.].  Fewins was a public school teacher in Aberdeen [The State Democrat (Aberdeen SD), June 23, 1899June 15, 1900Early History of Brown County, South Dakota, 107; “Sarah A Fewins,” Find-a-grave.com].

Rev. William Fielder (1853-1936) [Sioux Falls / Watertown / Aberdeen / Huron] served on the executive committee of the newly-organized South Dakota Equal Suffrage Association in October 1889, and his campaigning experience from the prohibition effort was useful to suffrage campaigners [Mitchell Daily Republican (Mitchell, SD), October 24, 1889; The Union Signal, 12/19/1889, Page 66, Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10; Ross-Nazzal, Winning the West for Women, 27]. 

“Rev. Wm. Fielder, of this city, is also a member of the committee. His great work in the prohibition campaign in our state during the last year is well known to all. To him perhaps more than to any other man, do we owe the grand victory achieved at the polls last October. And now as president of the Enforcement League he shows great prudence, carefulness and energy in its affairs, and is of great service in the councils of the Equal Suffrage association as a member of its [executive] board.”
Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), April 8, 1890.

Fielder was most influential in the temperance movement and was president of SD Enforcement League 1889 [Mitchell Daily Republican (Mitchell, SD), October 24, 1889; The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), December 31, 1889; The Saint Paul Globe (Saint Paul, MN), November 24, 1896; Kingsbury, History of Dakota Territory, vol. 3 (1915), 737].  In that role, he published a letter encouraging Prohibition supporters to support suffrage at the polls in 1890 [Page 051 : Printed Letter to Prohibition Voters, Rev. William Fielder, WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 9, DeVoe Collection, Primarily Washington].  Fielder was born in England and went to coastal Canada before coming as a missionary Methodist minister to South Dakota, arriving first in Sioux Falls in 1877.  He married Susan A. Dobson in 1855; she died in 1892.  Later, Fielder lived in Kansas, Minnesota, Texas, Oklahoma, and Alabama [William E. Connelley, A Standard History of Kansas and Kansans, vol. 5 (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Co., 1918), 2599; “Rev William Fielder,” Find-a-grave.com].  His photo is listed as an item in the John and Alice Pickler Papers, H91-074, Finding Aid, South Dakota State Archives, Pierre.

Averil H. Finch (1857-1922) [Ipswich, Edmunds County] agreed to serve as secretary of the county suffrage campaign committee in 1918 [Stevens to Pyle, March 12, 1918, RD08213, correspondence 1918-03-12 to 1918-03-17, Pyle papers USD].  Averil Hazen Bird was married to Robert F. Finch and were wealthy pioneers of the county [Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, SD), February 2, 1923; “Averil Hazen Bird Finch,” Find-a-grave.com].

Delle Finch (1867-1932) [Onida, Sully County] gave a reading at an equal suffrage program in Onida [Sully County Watchman (Onida, SD), May 2, 1891].  Florence Adelle Finch was a teacher who did a fair deal of oratorical programs for local organizations, including the W.C.T.U., Women’s Relief Corps, the literary society, and the Teachers’ Reading Circle [For example: Sully County Watchman (Onida, SD),July 20, 1889, August 16, 1890, October 4, 1890, August 8, 1891August 29, 1891, February 13, 1892, May 18, 1894].  She married Thomas E. Weed in 1892 and they eventually moved to Oregon [Sully County Watchman (Onida, SD), April 23, 1892; “Florence Adelle Weed,” Find-a-grave.com].

Mabel Finch [Onida, Sully County] gave recitation for a suffrage entertainment held at Blunt [Sully County Watchman (Onida, SD), November 1, 1890].  Finch was also involved with the Onida Literary society, and gave orations for W.C.T.U. meetings [For example: Sully County Watchman (Onida, SD), November 23, 1889December 13, 1890, February 3, 1893, February 24, 1893].  She was a teacher and eventually married John M. Arneson in 1918 [Sully County Watchman (Onida, SD), May 18, 1894; Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), August 31, 1911; SD Marriage Index via Ancestry.com].

Dr. Mary Findlater (1872-1942) [Lead, Lawrence County] spoke at local suffrage meetings during the 1914 campaign [Daily Deadwood Pioneer-Times (SD), October 31, 1914; Jean McLeod Doughty, “The Suffrage Movement in Lawrence County,” in Some History of Lawrence County (Deadwood: Lawrence County Historical Society, 1981), 655].  Findlater was a physician of Scotch descent from Canada, was involved with the Presbyterian women’s missionary society, and served on the board of education [Lead Daily Call (SD), April 20, 1911; Hot Springs Weekly Star (SD), April 11, 1913; Daily Deadwood Pioneer-Times (SD), April 22, 1914, April 13, 1917, April 17, 1917; “Mary E. Dr. Findlater,” Find-a-grave.com].  In 1917, she moved to Washington D.C. [Daily Deadwood Pioneer-Times (SD), April 17, 1917Deadwood Pioneer-Times (SD), September 14, 1960].

Mary Finney [Burkmere, Faulk County] was vice-president of the Burkmere suffrage club formed in 1890 [Citing Faulk County Record, Thursday, May 22, 1890, in Faulk County Newspaper Excerpts, SD Genealogy Trails].  There was not much information online, but this was the best match on Find-a-grave.com: “Mary Alice Stevens Finney, (1849-1916).”

* Edith Medbery Fitch (1876-1938) [Hurley / Yankton] was vice-president of the SD Equal Suffrage Association in 1909 and publicity/press committee chair in 1910; southeast district organizer in 1911, district auditor in 1912-1913 and district press chair in 1914 for SD Universal Franchise League.  More in link.

Edwin P. Fitch (1840-1931) [Parker, Turner County], as state representative, introduced a suffrage bill to the state legislature, but with a property-ownership qualification with which state suffrage leaders disagreed [Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), October 29, 1908The Citizen-Republican (Scotland SD), January 21, 1909; Sisseton Weekly Standard (SD), January 22, 1909; Madison Daily Leader (SD), March 02, 1909; Mitchell Capital (SD), March 4, 1909].  Fitch was born in Maine, served in the Civil War, and first came to Dakota Territory in 1888 to homestead in Sanborn County before settling near Parker [South Dakota Legislative Manual (1909), 650 (includes photo); “Sgt Edwin Peabody Fitch,” Find-a-grave.com].

Emma Monroe Fitch (1848-1939) [Milbank, Grant County] spoke at the county suffrage convention in 1897 and was elected treasurer of the Grant County suffrage association [The Herald-Advance (Milbank SD), October 29, 1897November 12, 1897].  She was also active with local and state charitable religious organizations [The Herald-Advance (Milbank SD), October 6, 1899; February 23, 1900; Annual Report of Woman’s Board of Missions of the Interior 31 (1899), 103].  Emma Elizabeth Monroe was born in Ohio, graduated from Oberlin in 1869, and married fellow student Charles N. Fitch in 1872 [The Herald-Advance (Milbank SD), June 16, 1899; Quinquennial catalogue of officers and graduates of Oberlin College (1916), 247; “Emma Monroe Fitch, (1848 – 1939),” Women’s Rights: Cornwall’s Radicals, Rebels, and Reformers, Cornwall Historical Society].  They came to Milbank in 1897, and also lived in Connecticut, New York, Michigan, and Colorado during their lives [The Herald-Advance (Milbank SD), October 22, 1897; “Emma Monroe Fitch, (1848 – 1939),” Cornwall Historical Society; “Our Heritage,” The First Congregational Church of the United Church of Christ, Spencerport NY; Oberlin Alumni Magazine 2 (1905), 66; Quinquennial catalogue of officers and graduates of Oberlin College (1916), 247].  Her father was James Monroe, a minister, abolitionist, and U.S. consul to Brazil in 1862-1870 [“Emma Monroe Fitch, (1848 – 1939),” Cornwall Historical Society; Letter to the editor, Pan-American Magazine 25(1) (May 1917), 11].

George William Fitch (1874-1954) [Hurley / Yankton] was on the executive committee of Men’s Equal Suffrage League of Yankton in 1916 [image of stationary from the league in the permanent exhibit at the SD Cultural Heritage Center].  Fitch married Edith Alma Medbery in 1900 [South Dakota State Archives biographical files: “Edith Medbery Fitch”, copy of forward to Poems from the Prairies (1947); Catalogue of Alumni and Former Students of Yankton College (October 1913), 88].  In September 1905, after publishing the Wakonda Monitor for five years, the Fitchs took over management of the Turner County Heraldnewspaper in Hurley [Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), August 31, 1905September 7, 1905].  They moved to Yankton by 1912 [Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), August 27, 1914August 26, 1915May 4, 1916July 26, 1917].  While in Yankton, Fitch worked in insurance, but must have stayed involved with publishing because he was elected vice-president upon the organization of the Missouri River Press Association in 1922 [The National Underwriter 22 (January 24, 1918), 10; Fourth Estate (February 18, 1922), 11].  The Fitchs moved to Madison by 1937 [Green Bay Press-Gazette (WI), December 11, 1937; “George W Fitch,” Find-a-grave.com].

Rev. Charles N. Fitch  (c1846-1924) [Milbank, Grant County] spoke at the county suffrage convention in 1897 on ‘Would Woman Suffrage Benefit the State?’ [The Herald-Advance (Milbank SD), October 29, 1897].  Fitch graduated from Oberlin in 1869, married fellow student Emma Elizabeth Monroe in 1872, and graduated from the Yale theology department in 1873 [The Herald-Advance (Milbank SD), June 16, 1899; Quinquennial catalogue of officers and graduates of Oberlin College (1916), 247; “Emma Monroe Fitch, (1848 – 1939),” Women’s Rights: Cornwall’s Radicals, Rebels, and Reformers, Cornwall Historical Society; Directory of the Living Graduates of Yale University (1901), 237].  They came to Milbank in 1897 where Fitch was pastor of the Congregational Church, and also lived in Connecticut, New York, Michigan, and Colorado during their lives [The Herald-Advance (Milbank SD), October 22, 1897; “Emma Monroe Fitch, (1848 – 1939),” Cornwall Historical Society; “Our Heritage,” The First Congregational Church of the United Church of Christ, Spencerport NY; Oberlin Alumni Magazine 2 (1905), 66; Quinquennial catalogue of officers and graduates of Oberlin College (1916), 247].

Mrs. S. Fitch [Milbank, Grant County] was elected treasurer of the Milbank suffrage association [The Herald-Advance (Milbank SD), November 12, 1897].  There was a Sarah Fitch (married to Thomas Fitch) in the area but I couldn’t confirm this was her.

Mary E. Fitts (1840-1904) [Madison, Lake County] served as treasurer for the Lake County Equal Suffrage Association upon its organization in July 1890 and delegate to the state suffrage convention [Madison Daily Leader (SD), September 2, 1890; Mary Kay Jennings, “Lake County Woman Suffrage Campaign in 1890,” South Dakota History (1975), 405-406].  Fitts came to Dakota Territory with her parents and siblings in 1883, was involved with the Order of the Eastern Star and W.C.T.U., and became a director of the First National Bank in Madison with relatives F.D. Fitts and G.L. McCallister [Madison Daily Leader (SD), March 12, 1904; Jennings, “Lake County,” 406; And for example: Madison Daily Leader (SD), January 15, 1891-January 9, 1896; American Bankers Association Proceedings (1897), 326 and (1902), 392].

Mary E. Fladmoe (1881-1954) [Clark’s Fork, Harding County] “of the post office” supported Rose Bower’s suffrage campaign through Harding County in 1914 [Woman’s West of the River Suffrage Number, Rapid City Daily Journal (SD), October 26, 1914].  Mary was married to Adolph P. Fladmoe, who was appointed postmaster in 1913 [Dakota Farmers’ Leader (Canton SD), May 23, 1913; “Mary E. Fladmoe,” Find-a-grave.com].

Mrs. Flynn [Deadwood, Lawrence County] attended tea with suffragists when Anthony came to speak in 1890 [Doughty, 655].  I can’t confirm this, but there was an “old pioneer” couple in Deadwood at the time, John H. and A. Harriet Flynn, who were active with the Black Hills Pioneer Association and the Women’s Relief Corps.  John H. Flynn had been mining editor for the Deadwood Pioneer but was killed in 1897.  Harriet Flynn ended up living with a son in New York City [Black Hills Union (Rapid City SD), January 17, 1890; Black Hills Daily Times (Deadwood, SD), October 9, 1896Hot Springs Weekly Star (SD), April 16, 1897; “Austin Haskell Flynn” Find-a-grave.com; Daily Deadwood Pioneer-Times (SD), January 6, 1918].

Annie D. Flinn (1862-1927) [Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County] participated with the rummage sale fundraiser for the local suffrage association in 1910 and was treasurer for the Minnehaha County Franchise League in the 1918 election [Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, SD), September 30, 1910; Belle Leavitt to Pyle, November 1, 1918, RA11619, Box 4, Correspondence, 1918, November 1-7, Pyle Papers USD]. With Leavitt and others from Sioux Falls, she attended the first SD League of Women Voters convention in Mitchell in October 1919 [Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, SD) October 18, 1919].  Her husband was John Flinn, and they lived at 417-421 W 9th St, Sioux Falls [1910 and 1920 censuses via Ancestry.com; “Annie D. Flinn,” Find-a-grave.com].

Ruby Flitcroft (Adams) [Madison, Lake County] was part of the choir that performed at Anna Howard Shaw’s lecture at the Madison opera house in 1890 [Madison Daily Leader (SD), April 21, 1890].  Ruby Flitcroft later married John Adams and moved west [Madison Daily Leader (SD), April 23, 1892; September 25, 1893].

* Kate Uline Folger (c1852-1896) [Watertown, Codington County] was corresponding secretary of the South Dakota Equal Suffrage Association from 1894 to her death in 1896 [Union County Courier (Elk Point SD), September 20, 1894; Dakota Farmers’ Leader (Canton SD), September 21, 1894; The Independent (Hawarden, IA), September 14, 1894; The Herald-Advance (Milbank SD), September 6, 1895, July 31, 1896; Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), September 19, 1895; Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), September 26, 1895; Rachel Foster Avery, ed., Proceedings of the 28th Annual Convention of the NAWSA (Philadelphia: Alfred J. Ferris, 1896), 158].  At the 1895 suffrage convention, she gave the secretary’s report, led a drill, and led devotions in the afternoon [Sioux City Journal (IA), September 6, 1895]. She was also secretary of the South Dakota W.C.T.U. in 1894 [Dakota Farmers’ Leader (Canton SD), September 21, 1894]. In 1896, Folger passed away of heart disease in Watertown [Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), July 30, 1896; The Herald-Advance (Milbank SD), July 31, 1896; et al.]. Later, Anna Simmons commented “In the death of our Corresponding Secretary we lost much that cannot be told in words” [Rachel Foster Avery, ed., Proceedings of the Twenty-Ninth Annual Convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association at Des Moines, Iowa, January 26-29, 1897 (Philadelphia: Alfred J. Ferris, 1897), 93].

Mary Edna Ford (1874-1969) [Deadwood, Lawrence County] was the vice-president of the Deadwood Literary Club when they had a program with a suffrage discussion [Daily Deadwood Pioneer-Times (SD), February 1, 1913]. In 1916, she was secretary of the Deadwood Woman’s Suffrage League [Daily Deadwood Pioneer-Times (SD), April 23, 1916].  Ford graduated from high school in Deadwood and became a teacher in the public schools there [Roster of Deadwood High School Graduates 1886-1971, City of Deadwood].  She also ran for county superintendent of schools and served at least some time in that capacity in the early 1930s [Daily Deadwood Pioneer-Times (SD), March 3, 1908; March 24, 1928; Weekly Pioneer-Times (Deadwood, SD), February 13, 1930; Deadwood Pioneer-Times (SD), January 9, 1931; May 19, 1933].  She also served as president of the Deadwood Library Board [South Dakota Library Bulletin (1952), 92Lead Daily Call (SD), November 10, 1949].  Ford passed away in 1969 [Deadwood Pioneer-Times (SD), January 29, 1969].

Bertha Fox [Lake County] served as president of The Grove Equal Suffrage Association [Madison Daily Leader (SD), September 2, 1890].  She was married to Noyes A. Fox, county sheriff, and also involved with the Rebekahs [Madison Daily Leader (SD), December 10, 1890, January 4, 1893, January 3, 1895].

Hattie E. Fox (1869-1946) [Mobridge, Walworth County] agreed to serve as secretary of the county suffrage campaign committee in 1918 [Stevens to Pyle, March 13, 1918, RD08217, correspondence 1918-03-12 to 1918-03-17, Pyle papers USD].  Fox attended a business college and started work in a bank in 1906, and was assistant cashier at the Mobridge State Bank in 1909-1910 [Aberdeen Democrat (SD), September 21, 1906; 1909 Mobridge Business Directory; South Dakota Department of Banking, Biennial Report of the Superintendent of Banks (1910), 335; 1910 U.S. Census for Mobridge].  Fox died in 1946 and was buried in Aberdeen [“Hattie Estelle Fox,” Find-a-grave.com].

Lulu A. Pickler Frad (1871-1965) [Mitchell, Davison County] attended the NAWSA convention in 1902 as proxy for the president (her mother Alice M.A. Pickler), supported suffrage through the Davison County W.C.T.U., and served as a national executive committee member for South Dakota in 1907-1908 [Proceedings of the 34th Annual Convention of NAWSA and First International Woman Suffrage Conference, Washington, D.C., February 12-18, 1902 (Washington DC, 1902), 55; Proceedings of the 39th Annual Convention of NAWSA, Chicago, February 14-19, inclusive, 1907 (Warren OH: Wm. Ritezel & Co., 1907), 167; Upton, 40th annual report of NAWSA, Buffalo, October 15-21, 1908 (Warren OH, 1908), 195; Mitchell Capital (SD), December 12, 1902 May 8, 1903]. Lulu Alberta Pickler was the daughter of John and Alice Pickler. After attending Dakota Wesleyan in Mitchell and Cornell, she taught school and in 1901, married William J. Frad in D.C. In 1902, he was assigned to the position of clerk at the post office in Mitchell. He soon after bought the Gazette newspaper in 1902-1903 and then bought a dry goods business that he ran for many years. They moved to Faulkton by 1909 [Mitchell Capital (SD), June 18, 1897, August 30, 1901, July 4, 1902, October 10, 1902, December 18, 1903, May 20, 1904, September 1, 1905, October 7, 1909; Minneapolis Journal, Saturday June 8, 1901, http://genealogytrails.com/sdak/faulk/newspapers.html; Pickler Papers finding aid, SDSHS; 1885-1940 census via Ancestry; “Lulu Alberta Pickler Frad,” Findagrave.com].

Clara R. Freeland [Wessington Springs, Jerauld County] was secretary-treasurer of the Jerauld County Woman’s Suffrage Association in 1889-1890 and served on the committee for constitution/by-laws [Wessington Springs Herald (SD), December 6, 1889, November 21, 1890].  When the organization had its county convention in March 1890, she served as convention secretary and the feature speaker, Susan B. Anthony, was entertained at the Methodist Seminary by Clara Freeland and her husband, Rev. / Prof. James Kendall (J.K.) Freeland, who were preceptress and principal of the seminary, respectively [Wessington Springs Herald (SD), May 16, 1890; “Clara Russell Freeland,” Find-a-grave.com].  Freeland was also involved with the local W.C.T.U. [Wessington Springs Herald (SD), November 21, 1890, July 24, 1891, December 11, 1891].  The Freelands had homesteaded in Faulk County, took the posts at the Methodist Seminary in Wessington Springs in 1887, and relocated to California for health reasons in 1896 [C.H. Ellis, History of Faulk County, South Dakota (Faulkton SD: Record Print, 1909), 381Wessington Springs Herald (SD), December 23, 1887Report of the South Dakota Superintendent of Public Instruction (1905), 101; N.J. Dunham, A History of Jerauld County (Wessington Springs SD, 1910), 246].  Freeland passed away in 1934 and was buried in Altadena, California [“Clara Russell Freeland,” Find-a-grave.com].

N.J. Dunham, A History of Jerauld County (1910), 331.

Louise French (1865-1956) [Huron, Beadle County] signed a suffrage petition published in July 1910 and was recording secretary for the South Dakota Equal Suffrage Association in 1910 [Daily Huronite (Huron SD), July 11, 1910, August 25, 1910; Union County Courier (Elk Point SD), September 1, 1910; RD10139, Mamie Shields Pyle Box 5, correspondence, M-Z, no date, Richardson Collection, USD].  French taught Latin in the high school in Huron and at Huron College, where her brother had served as its first president [The Citizen-Republican (Scotland SD), January 16, 1908; Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), July 30, 1929October 24, 1935].  She had multiple college degrees: Ph.B. from Wooster University (1899), A.B. from the University of Michigan (1903), and M.A. from the University of California-Berkeley (1920) [University of California-Berkeley, Fifty-seventh Commencement program, May 12, 1920, 37].   Also “Louise French,” Find-a-grave.com.

louise french
1922 U.S. passport application, via Ancestry.com