Biographies of Women’s Suffrage – E

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Lydia R. Eastwood (Watertown, Codington County) served as secretary of the newly-organized Watertown Universal Franchise League in 1914, was selected to represent Watertown at the state meeting in 1916, and served with her daughter Lila on the county suffrage campaign committee in 1918 [Saturday News (Watertown SD), May 14, 1914; June 29, 1916; August 10, 1916; Pidgeon to Pyle, February 8, 1918, RD07721, correspondence 1918-02-01 to 1918-02-08, Pyle papers USD].  Before her marriage, Eastwood had worked as a teacher [Saturday News (Watertown SD), July 22, 1910].  With her husband George H. Eastwood and their children (when they were of age), Lydia edited the Watertown Herald, and she was involved with the South Dakota Press Association [Mitchell Capital (SD), March 2, 1906; January 24, 1908; Hot Springs Weekly Star (SD), July 5, 1912; February 13, 1914; Saturday News (Watertown SD), October 1, 1914].  For her work as editor, she was implicated in three libel suits–with guilty verdict in at least one, and she advocated for free speech for the press [Saturday News (Watertown SD), November 13, 1908September 10, 1909; September 17, 1909; June 26, 1913; Sisseton Weekly Standard (SD), January 29, 1909; Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), July 14, 1910; Mitchell Capital (SD), December 11, 1913December 18, 1913; August 12, 1915].  Eastwood was also involved with the local Civic League and the Women’s Federation, and served an appointment on the state Women’s Board of Charities and Corrections [Saturday News (Watertown SD), March 20, 1908; March 28, 1912; March 8, 1917Madison Daily Leader (SD), May 26, 1908; May 10, 1909; The Citizen-Republican (Scotland SD), January 8, 1920].   In 1920, she stood for election to the state House of Representatives [The Citizen-Republican (Scotland SD), January 8, 1920].

LydiaEastwood_Watertown
Mitchell Capital (SD), January 24, 1908.

Lila G. Eastwood (Watertown, Codington County) served the Watertown Universal Franchise League as corresponding secretary, being elected at a meeting in the library basement in 1914, and she was on the county suffrage campaign committee in 1918 [Saturday News (Watertown SD), August 10, 1916; Pidgeon to Pyle, February 8, 1918, RD07721, correspondence 1918-02-01 to 1918-02-08, Pyle papers USD].  Lila Eastwood attended the state university in Vermillion and Northwestern University in Evanston, IL and then returned to work for the Watertown Herald with her family, though also was an artist (painter) [Saturday News (Watertown SD), October 3, 1912September 25, 1913; June 1, 1916; August 10, 1916; Hot Springs Weekly Star (SD), July 5, 1912].  After her mother’s death, she worked for the Jamestown Sun in North Dakota [Polk’s Jamestown City Directory (R.L. Polk & Co., 1959), 37; (1960), 50].

lilaeastwood
Lila G. Eastwood, from 1921 passport application, Ancestry.com.

Henry Z. Eaton (1837-1920) [Hot Springs, Fall River County] signed on as treasurer of the Hot Springs suffrage association in May 1890 and presided at the visit of Anthony and Shaw to Hot Springs that October [The Dakota Ruralist (Aberdeen SD), June 14, 1890, “Page 37 : Entire Page,” Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10; Hot Springs Star (SD), October 24, 1890]. Eaton was a Civil War veteran from Ohio and married Minerva Johnson in 1862 [Cleveland Morning Leader (OH), April 1, 1862, August 16, 1862, November 20, 1862; Lawrence Wilson, Ed. Itinerary of the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry 1861-1864 With Roster, Portraits and Biographies (New York: The Neale Publishing Co., 1907), 28, 99, 131, 189, 601]. In business, he was long the cashier and then vice-president of the Minnekahta Bank [Hot Springs Star (SD), July 27, 1888, September 19, 1890, August 21, 1891]. He served terms as treasurer for the Hot Springs’ school district and for Fall River County [Hot Springs Star (SD), June 22, 1888, January 11, 1889, June 20, 1890, October 17, 1890]. During his life, he was active in the G.A.R., the A.O.U.W., local literary society and Chautauqua, and the Black Hills college board of trustees [Perrysburg Journal (OH), December 14, 1877; Hot Springs Star (SD), May 20, 1887, June 3, 1887, November 25, 1887, January 13, 1888, October 4, 1889, February 7, 1890, May 16, 1890, December 19, 1890, September 4, 1891, January 15, 1892, June 8, 1894; Wellington Enterprise (OH), February 22, 1882; Hot Springs Weekly Star (SD), August 12, 1892, May 12, 1893]. The Eatons went to Chicago in 1894 to promote the trunk design that Minerva had invented. By 1901, they had moved to Chicago, and Henry worked as a post office director [Hot Springs Weekly Star (SD), June 8, 1894, July 20, 1894, July 19, 1901, August 5, 1904]. Also: “Lieut Henry Z Eaton,” or “Henry Zelora Eaton,” Findagrave.com

Minerva J. Eaton (c.1837-) [Hot Springs, Fall River County] signed on as a vice-president of the Hot Springs suffrage association organized at the visit of Emma Smith DeVoe in May 1890 [Hot Springs Star (SD), May 30, 1890; Minnekahta Herald (Hot Springs SD), May 28, 1890, “Page 36 : Entire Page,” and The Dakota Ruralist (Aberdeen SD), June 14, 1890, “Page 37 : Entire Page,” Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10]. Eaton also spoke on “Women in Politics” during the event welcoming Rev. J.W. Hancher as the college president [Hot Springs Star (SD), May 9, 1890]. Minerva Johnson was born in Ohio and married Henry Z. Eaton in 1862. She was involved with the Methodist Ladies Aid, the literary society and Chautauqua, the Women’s Relief Corps, and the W.C.T.U. [Hot Springs Star (SD), November 18, 1887, January 13, 1888, July 13, 1888, March 22, 1889, October 4, 1889, January 24, 1890, February 7, 1890, September 12, 1890, August 14, 1891, January 15, 1892, June 16, 1893, December 15, 1893]. In 1889, she patented a design for a trunk (luggage), the “Minerva Chiffonier trunk,” that she displayed at the Black Hills Chautauqua and marketed in Chicago [Hot Springs Weekly Star (SD), December 15, 1893, June 8, 1894; mentioned in finding aid for World’s Columbian Exposition collection at the Winethur Library; the 1889 patent]. By 1901, they had moved to Chicago, and Henry worked as a post office director [Hot Springs Weekly Star (SD), July 19, 1901]. Also: “Henry Zelora Eaton,” Findagrave.com.

Alonzo J. Edgerton (1827-1896) [Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County] was considered one of the “important” men who supported suffrage in the movement’s early years [Ceclia M. Wittmayer, “The 1889-1890 Woman Suffrage Campaign: A Need to Organize,” South Dakota History (1982), 200].  The 1886 history of the suffrage movement included the story: “Edgerton, said in his Fourth of July oration here: ‘How necessary it is for us to elect only good and honest men to office! To do this, woman likewise must act her part in the labor of arresting the advance of crime and corruption, although through timidity the politician is slow to invest her with the higher duties and obligations of American citizenship'” [Hustad/Anthony, History of Woman Suffrage 3 (1886), 666].  In a 1904 history of the state, he was called “a pronounced advocate of woman suffrage and appointed a woman official stenographer of his judicial district, the best salaried office within his gift.” [“History of Woman Suffrage in South Dakota,” from Doane Robinson, History of South Dakota, vol. 1 (1904), 597-604].  Alonzo Jay Edgerton was a Civil War veteran who came from Minnesota, where he was politically prominent, to Dakota Territory in 1881 when he became the presidential appointee for chief justice of the Supreme Court of Dakota Territory [“Alonzo J. Edgerton,” Wikipedia; “Alonzo Jay Edgerton,” Find-a-grave.com; SD Historical Society Foundation, “The Man Who Would Have Been Senator” (November 2014)].  He also served as president of the constitutional convention in 1885 and was appointed a federal judge [“Alonzo J. Edgerton,” Wikipedia; Kingsbury, History of Dakota Territory, vol. 3 (1915), 924].

John A. Eichenberg (Myron, Faulk County) was vice-president of the Myron suffrage club [Citing Faulk County Record, Thursday, May 22, 1890, in Faulk County Newspaper Excerpts, SD Genealogy Trails].

Col. Jeremiah E. Elson (1836-1897) [Huron, Beadle County] signed the press call for a state suffrage meeting in Huron in 1889, chaired the Beadle County Equal Suffrage Convention at Kilpatrick Hall, and was briefly secretary for the Beadle County Equal Sufffrage Association [Page 06 : The Convention Called and Huron Times (SD), February 28, 1890 in “Page 25 : Beadle County Equal Suffrage Convention,” Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10; Wessington Springs Herald (SD), March 14, 1890; The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), May 13, 1890].  He spoke during the celebration held by Huron suffragists in honor of Susan B. Anthony’s birthday, where he said he had recently been “converted” to suffrage [Huron Dakota Huronite (SD), February 20, 1890; Leavenworth Times (KS), March 11, 1890; Huron Daily Times (SD), February 17, 1890, “Page 26 : Susan B. Anthony Honored,” and “Page 26 : In Honor of Miss Anthony,” Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10]. Elson was married to Mary E. Rathbun in 1864 [“Col Jerry E Elson,” Find-a-grave.com citing The Daily Huronite (SD), May 31, 1897].  Elson owned a newspaper, the Huron Free Trade Democrat [Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), July 14, 1887].   He was also deeply involved with the Grand Army of the Republic, and was key to establishing the Women’s Relief Corps in the state.  For that work, he was “made an honorary member…, an honor conferred upon no other man living, he being the only man ever admitted to the Woman’s Relief Corps” [Hot Springs Weekly Star (SD), May 11, 1894; Mitchell Capital (SD), June 4, 1897; “Col Jerry E Elson,” Find-a-grave.com (and photo)].

* Mary E. Elson (1847-1911) [Huron, Beadle County] was one of the group of who invited people to a meeting at the Baptist church in Huron to help plan the state’s first suffrage convention and signed the press call for the convention itself [“Page 06 : A Special Meeting,” “Page 06 : The Convention Called,” and Huron Times, February 28, 1890, Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10; Wessington Springs Herald (SD), March 14, 1890; Madison Daily Leader (SD), June 24, 1890; Kimball Graphic (SD), July 4, 1890]. In February 1890, she spoke at the celebration held in honor of Susan B. Anthony’s 70th birthday [Huron Dakota Huronite (SD), February 20, 1890; Huron Daily Times (SD), February 17, 1890, “Page 26 : Susan B. Anthony Honored,” Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10]. She accompanied Emma DeVoe to speak on suffrage in Cavour in February 1890 [Daily Huronite (SD), February 6, 1890, “Page 65 : Entire Page,” Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10]. In March 1890, she was elected secretary of the Beadle County Equal Suffrage Association [Sturgis Advertiser (SD), March 13, 1890; Hot Springs Star (SD), March 14, 1890; Wessington Springs Herald (SD), March 14, 1890]. She wrote a suffrage column for the Huron Herald Democrat [“Page 27 : Among the Workers,” Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10]. In 1892, she was elected a member of the state executive committee in 1892 at the state convention in Huron [The Herald-Advance (Milbank SD), January 1, 1892].  Mary Rathbun married J.E. Elson in 1864 [“Col Jerry E Elson,” Find-a-grave.com citing The Daily Huronite (SD), May 31, 1897].  Mary Elson was highly active in the Woman’s Relief Corps [Turner County Herald (Hurley SD), January 26, 1911; “Mary E Elson,” Find-a-grave.com].

June Emry (c1886-1957) [Madison, Lake County] was called to a suffrage meeting in 1918 to circulate petitions for Amendment E [Madison Daily Leader (SD), March 8, 1918]. In 1926, she served as the South Dakota League of Women Voters’ chair for Education [The Discerning Voter 1(6) (February 1926), 4, 1(7) (March 1926), 3, 1(9) (May 1926), 3, and 2(2) (September-October 1926), 4]. Emry was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State Teacher’s College and a university in Chicago. She came from Paonia, Colorado to Madison in 1913 to teach at Central High School. She later served as high school principal, city school superintendent, and county school superintendent, until taking a position at the Normal School (now Dakota State University) in Madison. She later became registrar, dean, and vice-president of the college. In 1921, she also was the second woman to be elected president of the South Dakota Educational Association (first being Kate Taubman in 1895). After a period during the Great Depression, when she and Alice Montgomery went to Faribault, Minnesota to run a bookstore and then Emry went to graduate school in Oregon, she returned to the college in Madison and retired in 1956 as an instructor in the social science department. Alice M. Montgomery also worked at the college, and they lived together as early as 1920. In 1969, the college dedicated a new dormitory as June Emry Hall [“Alumni Affairs,” University of Chicago Magazine 5 (1913), 99; Madison Daily Leader (SD), August 27, 1915, April 28, 1916, January 5, 1917, February 24, 1917, April 20, 1918, May 25, 1918, pg. 2, (bio) pg. 3, November 21, 1918, February 7, 1919, April 28, 1919, August 21, 1920, August 24, 1920, September 13, 1920, November 26, 1920, February 23, 1921, November 10, 1921, November 22, 1921, July 8, 1922; The Pioneer-Review (Philip SD), December 1, 1921; Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, SD), May 12, 1954; The Daily Republic (Mitchell, SD), December 7, 1957; The Eastern [Eastern Normal School newspaper] 24(1) (October 1943), 1, 26(6) (March 1946), 1, 31(1) (September 1951), 5, 34(1) (September 25, 1953), 1, 36(9) (May 1956), 1, 38(6) (February 1958), 3, and 50(5) (October 6, 1969), 1; June Emry Hall dedication program, DSU archives, DLSD; 1920-1940 census via Ancestry.com].

* Rev. Elisha English (1851-1891) [Huron, Beadle County] signed the press call for a state suffrage meeting in Huron in October 1889, had charge of a planning meeting for the 1889 convention at his church, and spoke at the county suffrage convention in March 1890 [Huron Times, February 28, 1890, Page 06 : The Convention Called, Page 06 : A Special Meeting, and The Woman’s Tribune (Boston), March 15, 1890 in “Page 27 : Beadle County Convention,” Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10].  As “suffragist and brother-in-law” to the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, English made brief remarks at the Beadle County Fair’s Woman’s Day in 1889 [Page 09 : South Dakota — Equal Suffrage Work, Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10].  He also gave public lectures on “Women and the Ballot” and “Woman in Politics” in Mitchell and Brookings [Mitchell Daily Republican (SD), January 11, 1890; The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), February 26, 1890].  Before the vote on suffrage in 1890, English moved to Greeley, Colorado, saying that he “wished that he might have voted for equal suffrage in this state: but rejoiced that he had been allowed to assist in gaining constitutional prohibition.” [The Daily Plainsman (Huron, SD), October 13, 1890].  English had come to the First Baptist Church in Huron from Grinnell, Iowa, in 1886.  From his position at the Baptist church, he also had a connection to early advocates like the Devoes and the Barkers who were church members [Wessington Springs Herald (SD), October 29, 1886; Jennifer M. Ross-Nazzal,  Winning the West for Women: The Life of Suffragist Emma Smith DeVoe (Seattle: The University of Washington Press, 2011), 16, 21].  English had married Florence Trumbull in 1883 [“Rev Elisha English,” Find-a-grave.com].

Florence Trumbull English () [Huron, Beadle County] signed the press call for a state suffrage meeting in Huron in 1889 [Page 06 : The Convention Called, Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10].  Florence Trumbell married Elisha English in 1883, they came to Dakota Territory in 1886, and they moved to Greeley, Colorado in 1890.  After her husband’s death in 1891, she moved to Hyde Park IL and later in life to Lynchburg VA [“Rev Elisha English,” Find-a-grave.com].

Mary M. Eneboe (Canton, Lincoln County) served on the campaign committee for Canton, and organizer McMahon wrote of her that she was “such a wholesome Norwegian that I was much drawn to her” [McMahon to Pyle, February 25, 1918, RD07979, correspondence 1918-02-19 to 1918-02-28, Pyle papers USD].  Mary M. Lunder was married to osteopath Edward P. Eneboe [RD07979, Pyle papers USD; “Mary M. Lunder Eneboe,” Find-a-grave.com].

Viva F. Everhard (Highmore, Hyde County) was a delegate to the state suffrage convention at Mitchell in October 1897, and went from there to the state W.C.T.U. convention in Vermillion [Mitchell Capital (SD), October 1, 1897; October 8, 1897].

Frank A. Everts [Onida, Sully County] became secretary of a local equal suffrage club after meeting at schoolhouse in 1891 and presented a poem for a subsequent meeting program [Sully County Watchman (Onida SD), January 24, 1891February 14, 1891].  Everts had come to Sully County in 1883 to homestead, ran the Onida Journal, and supported temperance [Sully County Watchman (Onida SD), December 22, 1883, December 6, 1884, January 31, 1885, March 08, 1890].

George W. Everts (1840-___) [Onida, Sully County] was president of the Onida Equal Suffrage Club when in formed in April 1890, served on the committee on the plan of work for the Sully County ESA organized by Alice Pickler in August 1890, and participated in subsequent suffrage meetings [Sully County Watchman (Onida SD), April 19, 1890, August 23, 1890, April 25, 1891, May 2, 1891].  Everts came to Sully County in January 1883 to homestead.  He also served as justice of the peace, was a trustee of the State Normal School in Madison, candidate for state senate (Republican) and State Auditor (Independent), commander of the Onida G.A.R. post, treasurer of the local Old Settlers’ Association, editor of the Onida Journal, “an outspoken temperance man,” and led the Populist Party’s county convention [Sully County Watchman (Onida SD), August 3, 1889September 7, 1889September 14, 1889 (quote), December 14, 1889, September 6, 1890October 3, 1891July 30, 1892, October 15, 1892, June 8, 1894Dakota Farmers’ Leader (Canton SD), June 8, 1894August 10, 1894; Onida Journal (SD), April 19, 1890, Page 32 : [news clipping: Emma Smith DeVoe in Onida], Emma Smith DeVoe: 1880-1890 (Scrapbook D), WSL Manuscripts, MS 171, Box 10].

Adolph W. Ewert (1865-1935) (Pierre, Hughes County) and his wife were “friends of the suffrage movement” who helped arrange a publishing plant for putting out suffrage-related press material [Dorinda Riessen Reed, The Woman Suffrage Movement in South Dakota (Pierre: Commission on the Status of Women, 1975 [1958]), 63].  Ewert came to Pierre in 1890; was a cashier at National Bank of Commerce, mayor of Pierre, state Senator, and State Treasurer; and was married to Carrie Dutcher in 1890 [Dakota Farmers’ Leader (Canton SD), April 25, 1902Pierre Weekly Free Press (SD), June 8, 1905; October 19, 1905; Reed, The Woman Suffrage Movement, 63; “Adolph W. Ewert,” SD Legislative Research Council; Daily Capital Journal (Pierre SD), June 17, 1935].  Photo: Deutscher Herold (Sioux Falls SD), May 9, 1912.  Also: “Adolph W. Ewert,” Find-a-grave.com.

Carrie Ewert  (1866-1960) (Pierre, Hughes County) and her husband were “friends of the suffrage movement” who helped arrange a publishing plant for putting out suffrage-related press material, she addressed the state convention of the SD Universal Franchise League in November 1915, and she served as county organizer for the suffrage campaign in 1918 [Dorinda Riessen Reed, The Woman Suffrage Movement in South Dakota (Pierre: Commission on the Status of Women, 1975 [1958]), 63; The Citizen-Republican (Scotland SD), November 25, 1915; Letter from Ewert, copied to Breeden, April 18, 1918, RD06888, correspondence 1914-1933, Breeden papers USD]. When Hughes County organized a chapter of the League of Women Voters, she signed the call for the organizational meeting [Schuler, Pierre since 1910, 220].  Ewert was involved also with the General Federation of Women’s Clubs in South Dakota [Helen M. Winslow, Official Register and Directory of Women’s Clubs 18 (1916), 194].  Carrie Dutcher married Adolph Ewert in Michigan in 1890 [Daily Capital Journal (Pierre SD), March 9, 1960].  Also: “Caroline Elma ‘Carrie’ Ewert,” Find-a-grave.com.