Women in Business in Faulkton, 1909

A while back I did a series of posts on the women included in the 1909 business directory for the city of Sioux Falls.  I came across a website with a 1909 list of businesses and their owners for the much smaller city of Faulkton (link here) and thought I’d try the same research experiment with the women listed there.  The directory was transcribed by K. Torp from a 1909 published county history by C.H. Ellis.  There were several that were hard to find, perhaps they were transient, or married and their marriage record didn’t come up, for whatever reason, on Ancestry.com.  Several of the women worked with/for their husbands or fathers, or took over the management of a business after their husband’s death.  Then, there was Abbie Jarvis who was known for delivering babies, which was a branch of medicine that I would assume was more accessible for women at the time, but she also was so driven to become a qualified doctor that she went to another city, with her two youngest children, in order to pursue that education.  She was the first woman licensed to be a doctor and pharmacist in the state,  and proceeded to have a long and respected career.

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Digital Research Tools 3

For this West River edition of “Digital Research Tools,” I’ve included collections in Hot Springs, Spearfish, and Deadwood.  Thank you to the librarians, archivists, grant-writers, donors, and supporters who are helping to make these collections available.  Back in the day, I did a couple student gigs as an archive intern, scanning material and entering metadata for each and every record.  It takes an incredible amount of time and organizational energy to turn tactile records into digital ones and put them out there for the public in an accessible way–particularly for a local public library, for which archive digitization would seem to be outside their typical wheelhouse.  Thank you working to bring new life to our past!

Helen Magee Collection, Hot Springs Public Library: The library in Hot Springs is the repository of the exhaustive collection of local historian Helen Magee, who meticulously recorded years and years of obituaries, mortuary records, birth announcements, “on this day…” news articles, event flyers, and more.  The collection is digitized and searchable to an extent–handwritten material doesn’t come up in the searches, some was later typed out but some wasn’t.  Magee’s information was arranged at some point into binders by subject matter, so if you’re curious, go through to the subject of interest and browse to your hearts content.  The library also has the hard-copies in their Heritage Room if you plan a research trip there.

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Hot Springs, January 2017, photograph from South Dakota State Historic Preservation Office.

Leland D. Case Library, Black Hills State University, Spearfish:  This link takes you to a list of the collections held at the Case Library at BHSU in Spearfish.  The descriptions of each collection have links then to finding aids or search options if that collection has digitally-viewable material.  It looks like… they have digitized material from the Black Hills National Forest Historical Collection, the Troy L. and Watson Parker Collection (Black Hills ephemera and research notebooks on ghost towns), the Father Szalay collection (heavy on maps), the Wharf Resources, Inc. collection on the Bald Mountain Mining Company, and several collections of research materials from historians and authors.

Deadwood History: This link will take to a page about research options with Deadwood History.  There’s a link to their digital collection, and a link to their finding aids if you want to look deeper into their available collections.  If you go to their digital collections, there’s a Random Images link at the top that’s a fun way to get a glimpse at the wide variety of things they have.

South Dakota Architects – Berg, Bjodstrup, and The Black Hills Co.

This post is the third in a series on architects (and some builders) who were residents of South Dakota in order to dig a bit into their lives and work.  Some made a bigger impact and/or left a better historical record than others, but we miss something if we only study the biggest names.  There are a handful that were only mentioned once and I can’t find anything else about them – maybe I’ll include them in a list at the end…  I’ll do my best to restrict these profiles to architects who are now deceased.  If any readers have additional information or corrections, please leave a note in the comments! Continue reading

Public Art in South Dakota

“Dignity,” by Dale Lamphere, photograph by author, 2016.

The new 50-foot sculpture by Dale Lamphere called “Dignity” installed at a point above the highway at Chamberlain has me thinking about South Dakota’s public art and the history thereof.  So here’s some that I can think of… suggestions and additions are very welcome!


Mount Rushmore National Memorial: Most assuredly the best known work of public art in South Dakota.  The memorial was designed by Gutzon Borglum and built from 1927-1941.  The original idea for a memorial was actually from Doane Robinson, state historian, who proposed carving historical figures of the American West into the Continue reading

John Robertson and Fruit-growing in the Black Hills

Since working on a project about the Gurney Seed and Nursery Company in Yankton, I’ve been digging into the history of horticulture in South Dakota as I have opportunity.  In research searches about the phenomenon of farmers’ institutes, I hit a point of cross-over in John Robertson.  Robertson had a fruit orchard nursery in Hot Springs and was one of the few prominent players in the field of horticulture in early South Dakota from the Black Hills region.  [Fred Noerenberg had another well-known orchard at Cascade Springs.]

John Stevenston Robertson (1866–1935) was born in Ohio to Scottish-immigrant parents and migrated with his family to Nebraska.  He moved to Fall River County in March 1889 and homesteaded land in the Erskine/Minnekahta area near Hot Springs in June 1892.  He planted his first apple trees in 1896 and eventually had a twenty-acre orchard that included over a hundred varieties of apples (at various times), as well as grapes, plums, pears, cherries, currants, gooseberries raspberries, strawberries, pansies, corn and small grains, and asparagus.  He experimented with different varieties and growing techniques to find what was best adapted to the climate and terrain.  He cooperated with horticulturalists across the state, particularly N.E. Hansen and his students at the Agricultural College in Brookings, to test developed varieties and share results.  He also sold some “limited” nursery stock of dependable varieties.

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Women of the South Dakota Farmers Institutes

A while back, I was reading an article about the relationship between farmers and agronomists in the period where the ag science was blossoming, but before hybridization.  Curious about how that played out in South Dakota, I thought of the farmer’s institutes that the Agricultural College in Brookings and the state put on in different places.  So I’ve started going through the Library of Congress’s Chronicling America collection (love some good LOC time) searching for news printed about the farmers institutes in South Dakota papers.

From the 1880s to the 1910s, counties across the state hosted “farmers’ institutes” that could be one to four days of lectures and demonstrations on agricultural topics at a central spot like a courthouse or opera house.  In SD and elsewhere, they later evolved into more formal “short courses” directed by the state’s agricultural college and its extension offices.  Many farmers’ institutes involved judged contests for corn or grains, both for men and boys.  Many also seem to have made a special effort to get women to attend by providing special sessions on domestic science–topics of home sanitation, caring for the sick, different cooking techniques, etc.  This in turn made me curious about the women who served as instructors, so here is what I could find out about the female instructors I’m coming across in the newspapers.  I am way down the rabbit hole at this point…  As is often the case, it was amazing to actually see their faces when photographs were included in the newspapers and other publications, and to read their own words when full text articles and speeches were printed.

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Digital Research Tools 2

For histories of science, environment, and agriculture, SDSU has their Agricultural Experiment Bulletins from 1887 and Research Station reports from 1961 posted online, as well as other department reports and publications.  The website is called Open PRAIRIE, link to earliest Bulletins here.

There are a ton of archival resources outside the state that give us insight into South Dakota history.  The New York Public Library has an amazing archive and has made many of their collections available digitally.  See the 104 results that I found searching for “South Dakota” at this link here.

Historic maps can be critical research tools, but also super fun.  The David Rumsey Historical Map Collection is infamous and the 158 results for South Dakota include published atlases as well as exploration maps, territorial maps, railroad maps, soil maps, and tourist maps–link here.  Then, the US Geological Survey recently made historical topographic maps available in a new user-friendly platform, link here.